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GRE Score Range: What’s a Good GRE Score?

This post was updated in May 2018 to reflect the latest score information available.

One question we at Magoosh get asked a lot is “What is a good GRE score?” Here’s the first thing you need to know: GRE scores range from 130 to 170 per section. Combined GRE scores range from 260-340.

Another important fact to keep in mind when considering “good” GRE scores:

The average GRE score is approximately 304, or 151 in Verbal and around 153 in Quant.

However, even that info only tells us so much. The GRE exam score range for students admitted to different graduate schools, and even different programs at the same school, varies widely. All in all, several factors will affect what good GRE scores are for you.

Determining what a good score is for you will take some time and research. But if you can identify your target score early in your GRE prep, you’ll be more likely to hit that target since you can focus your study plan accordingly. It’s well worth it!

So with that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the factors that make a good GRE score—and see how you can maximize your score in the process.

Table of Contents

GRE Score Range
GRE Test Score Range By Program
GRE Scores at Top Universities
Average GRE Scores
Okay…So What IS a Good GRE Score?
And What’s a Bad GRE Score?
How to Improve Your GRE Scores


 

GRE Score Range

good gre scores - magoosh
 
If you have friends or relatives who took the GRE prior to 2012, you (or they) might be looking at the new GRE score range with a puzzled expression. Today, the GRE score range runs from 260 to 340—NOT from 200 to 800, as it used to. (This post can help you out with a GRE score conversion!)

Because the combined score is of relatively little importance, here are those numbers in a slightly different form:

GRE Score Range

 MinimumMaximum
Verbal130170
Quantitative130170
Combined260340

It can definitely be confusing to contextualize your scores, especially because comparing Verbal scores to Quant scores can feel like comparing apples to oranges. So let’s take a look at sectional scores and break it down a little more.

GRE In-Section Scores

Because it’s so important, here it is one more time:

Perfect GRE scores are 170 in each section, 340 combined.

Keep in mind that, depending on your program, your scores in one section may be weighted much more strongly in admissions. Potential English Lit MAs don’t have to worry about Quant quite as much as potential Engineering PhDs. However, scoring high in both sections is a definite plus.

For more about the importance of in-section scores by program, check out our following posts:

Understanding GRE Percentiles

In short, a percentile describes the percentage of test-takers who scored lower than you. If you scored in the 75th percentile, for example, that means that you scored better than 75 out of every 100 GRE test-takers.

You can check out our run-down of GRE percentiles here, but here are some salient points for take-away:

  • You can’t score higher than the 97th percentile in Quant: about 3% of students taking the exam get a perfect score in this section.
  • The same thing isn’t true for Verbal, where only 1% of students get a perfect score (so guess which section most test-takers consider harder?).
  • The top 10% of test-takers score 162+ in Verbal and 166+ in Quant.
  • The bottom 10% of test-takers score below 140 in Verbal and 141 in Quant.

 
In terms of percentiles, most people would consider scoring within the top 10% of all test-takers pretty good!

But, at the end of the day, a good GRE score is the one that helps you get into the program of your dreams. And for the top programs in different fields, that can be pretty high…


 

GRE Test Score Range by Program

good gre score - magoosh
A good score on the GRE varies significantly by program. For instance, applicants admitted to the top 10 Engineering programs in 2018 had an average GRE Quant score of 166. That score is at the 91st percentile on the GRE.

However, applicants admitted to the top 10 Education programs had an average GRE Quant score of 155 (down from 157 last year), about 59th percentile on the new GRE. That’s a quite a difference!

To get an idea of what scores are like for programs you’re targeting, check out our GRE Scores Infographic to learn the average GRE scores of admitted students in your chosen academic discipline! Just click the image below to start identifying your target GRE score:
 
gre scores - magoosh


 

GRE Scores for Top Universities

Of course, which school you’re applying to will also have a lot to do with your target GRE score.

Students admitted to the most competitive program at Harvard—English— had estimated Verbal scores of 160-164 and estimated Quant scores of 151-155 (so you see, discipline does make a difference to the relative weight adcoms give to each section!).

But on the other hand, less competitive programs at Harvard admitted students with Quant scores as low as 150 and Verbal as low as 149. Again, it all depends on the program, as well as the school (for more on this, you can check out our post on GRE Scores for Top Universities).

How do I find out how my grad schools use the GRE?

Are you aiming for a top 10 school or a top 50 school in your program? Do you have a specific dream school? By answering these questions, you can better determine what type of score you’ll need on the new GRE.

As we’ve seen, what’s a good GRE score can vary from school to school. So how do you figure out how your schools use the GRE, especially if they’re not on the above list?

Find your schools’ stats

Start by looking up the stats for the programs you’ll be applying to. The US News & World Report has reliable data that you can use to ground yourself in the basics. But the best thing to do for the whole story?

Talk to current students and the admissions committee

Some schools care more about Quant and others care more about Verbal. So how can you tell?

  • Find out which a target program/school is interested in by talking to the admissions committee and current students.
  • Go to their website and find a contact to email. Let them know you are a prospective student and provide some background about yourself.
  • In many cases, schools will try to connect you with a current student who has a similar background to you.
  • Use that opportunity to learn about the admissions process and the program as a whole.

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Average GRE Scores

If you’re still wondering how to evaluate your scores in terms of the general pool of test-takers, looking at average GRE scores can help. How? By providing a bigger picture of everyone taking the test and showing you were that middle point is.

Contextualizing your GRE Scores

A lot of students aim for the skies and think of their goals in terms of a perfect score—a 170. But the reality is that many of us don’t need to attain such a lofty score. Instead, your program might only require that you score 150 in each section.

Just how difficult is that? Wouldn’t it just be a 50 percentile score since 150 is smack dab in the middle of 130 and 170?

It’s actually not that straightforward. In fact, as we’ve already seen, it differs for each section.

In Quant, a 150 means that you scored better than 39% of test takers, whereas a 150 in verbal means you did better than 47% of test takers. Sure, these numbers differ pretty substantially, but what’s interesting is that both percentiles are less than 50%, with the math section being significantly so.

If you haven’t taken the test yet, and are worried about breaking 150 in each section, you don’t have to worry nearly as much as you would if a 150 in both sections corresponded to a 50th percentile mark.

Average GRE Scores by Section

So if you’re aiming to do better than average, what are those magic numbers?

The average Verbal score is 151, and the average Quant score is around 153.

(Actually, to be precise, they’re 150.22 and 152.47, but since those are impossible scores for an individual to get, we’ve rounded up.)


 

Okay…So What IS a Good GRE Score?

I can’t say it enough: good” scores depend on your particular target school and program. But if you’re going to push me for an answer…

In very general terms, above the 75th percentile in either section is good. That’s about a 160 or higher in Quant and a 157 or higher in Verbal.

Scores at least one standard deviation from the mean are even better, 161 in Quant and 159 in Verbal.

And scores two standard deviations from the mean put you in the top 5%, 166 in Quant and 165 in Verbal, at which point your GRE score will certainly not be an impediment.


 

And What’s a Bad GRE Score?

A bad GRE score is one that excludes you from the program that you want to attend. That’s all!

However, to put this in very general terms, the bottom 10% of test-takers score below 140 in Verbal and 141 in Quant.

Again—very generally!—a good goal is to score better than average on the GRE.

Can you get into your dream program with a below-average score? Sure.

But the admitted students who perform below average on the GRE may have extraordinary stories, great GPAs, and/or fantastic work experience. To improve your odds of acceptance, do better than average.

On the other hand, there’s no need to overdo it. If you are aiming for a program that has an average Quant score of 155, and you score 160, you likely don’t need to take the GRE again, even if you think you could get 165. You have already demonstrated that you have quantitative aptitude; now, it’s time to focus on the rest of your application.

What should I do if I don’t have a good GRE score?

No matter what the case, don’t despair! If you have taken the test and were, say, a 145 scorer in both sections (that works out to the 26th percentile in Verbal and the 20th percentile in Quant) then your road to improvement is pretty steep, but very doable.

That might sound counterintuitive. Why would a steep increase in percentages make something more doable?

Well, imagine you had to go from an 80% to a 99%, which is the same percentage difference as that between a 39% and a 20%. That’s going from better than most to the best of the best.

That is really hard to do.

If you’ve scored in the 80th percentile, you have most likely already been preparing for the GRE. On the other hand, many of those who initially score low went in cold (or at least lukewarm).

By prepping hard for a month or two, you should be able to jump from the lowly 20s to the respectable 37th percentile: a mere five points, but you never know! It could be the difference between getting into a program and not getting into a program.


 

How to Improve Your GRE Scores

With all of those factors in mind, it’s time to set your target score (or rather, target scores—one for each section). Why? It’ll help you enormously as you go forward in your prep.

Speaking of which, you can definitely boost your scores to where you want them to be.

Prep for the GRE with Your Target Score in Mind

You’ve already taken the first step to reaching your target score by reading through this post. By researching GRE scores ahead of time, you can determine what areas to focus on for your GRE prep before your next GRE exam date. For instance, if your program is more interested in quant, then spend more time working on quant. Review our Complete Hassle-Free Guide to the GRE for an overview of all the sections, then delegate your time accordingly.

We have a quite a few GRE study plans to help you with your prep. They provide options for students preparing for 1 week, 6 months, or anything in between.

We also have a score increase guarantee for those re-taking the exam, and GRE Prep Apps (iPhone/Android) that allow you to take your prep on the go.

Magoosh students score 12 points better than average on the GRE. Click here to  learn more!

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49 Responses to GRE Score Range: What’s a Good GRE Score?

  1. Harshit June 15, 2018 at 12:02 pm #

    I scored 298 in GRE (157-Q and 141-V) , I have a strong gpa, 4 publication and good sop.
    Please suggest if I should retake my GRE or should apply with this score.
    I am focusing on University of Texas at Dallas .

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert June 19, 2018 at 4:39 pm #

      Hi Harshit,

      Our expertise is in test prep, not admissions advice, so I”m afraid we aren’t the best people to answer this question! I recommend that you do some research on the school or contact an admissions counselor to ask about their admissions preferences. This varies widely by school and department, so it’s really best to get the information straight from the source!

  2. psyche June 15, 2018 at 5:50 am #

    Hi, I am applying to Univ of Springfield, for Msc in public health. I had 147QR and 145VB in GRE. Do I stand a chance getting admitted?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert June 15, 2018 at 11:25 am #

      Hi there,

      Our expertise is in test prep, not admissions advice, so I’m afraid we aren’t the best people to answer your question! I recommend that you reach out to an admissions counselor at the school to determine their GRE requirements, and even talk to current students to get their thoughts on the issue 🙂 Good luck!

  3. Petria June 6, 2018 at 6:04 pm #

    Hello,

    I scored a 144 on quant and a 136 on verbal the first time I took the GRE, I kind of went in lukewarm with the thought that I knew I had to prepare longer. I did the Kaplan book first, which obviously did not help me much…I just purchased the Magoosh 6 month study lesson and hope to increase my Quant to a 150 and verbal at least a 145…I was thinking of giving myself about 8 more weeks to study and take it again. Do you think the score I want to achieve are realistic after scoring so low the first time? I would be spending about 30 hours a week practicing and going over lessons.

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert June 7, 2018 at 11:02 am #

      Hi Petria,

      At roughly 2 months of study, 30 hours a week, a 6 point boost in Quant and a 9 point boost in Verbal could be possible, for certain. Given the unusually high amount of hours per week that you have for studies, you may want to modify one of Magoosh’s GRE study plans, allowing for more study time than the 15-20 hours that most of our plans require. 🙂 And since you’re a GRE Premium subscriber, feel free to use the “Help” tab to contact our email support tutors if you need advice on how to put together your study plan.

  4. JP May 15, 2018 at 6:19 pm #

    Hi,

    My GRE score is 292. Can you please suggest some best universities for me to pursue data analytics? I m planning for this spring.

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert May 16, 2018 at 7:51 pm #

      That score is a little bit on the lower end. Based just on what you’ve told me, though, it’s honestly a little hard to say exactly which schools might take you. Data analytics programs tend to emphasize Quant much more than Verbal, so if the Quant component of your 292 is higher than 150 (the higher the better), your chances of getting accepted at a respectable school are greater. If you can tell me your individual Quant and verbal section scores, I might be able to give you a more specific answer.

  5. Stacey April 26, 2018 at 4:26 pm #

    I’ve been studying for the GRE for 3.5 months now with test prep and only saw a 1 point increase in my quant and 4 point increase in verbal. I focused mainly on quant and only 11 hours on verbal. The school I am trying to get into has a median GRE quant score in the 85th percentile. I’ve done well in my math subjects (career changer here from clinician to programmer) with a B+ in Calc 3 and an A in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations but can’t seem to show a stronger quant score! The school uses a holistic approach to the app review process and I’ve opted to submit my application early. They are waiting on my GRE scores now. With a quant of 150 and verbal of 155, and putting hours toward quant in studying, what do you think I should do?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert April 27, 2018 at 4:18 pm #

      Hi Stacey,

      I understand how nerve-wracking this decision is, and how frustrating it is to study so much without seeing an improvement! Our expertise is in test prep, so I”m not sure if we’re in the best position to give you advice here, but I can certainly try to help you think through this decision. First, it’s important to realize that the GRE isn’t about super difficult and high-level math…it’s really all about critical thinking and creative problem-solving. It’s not uncommon to see people who are successful in advanced math classes struggle with GRE math–it’s just a different approach and mindset.
      I recommend that you contact the school and ask for their thoughts on your GRE scores. If the school takes a holistic look at the application, then you may be able to make up for poor GRE scores with the other components of your application, and explain the scores on your essay. We have some tips for dealing with a low GPA, and similar principles apply for a low GRE score.
      Finally, you can consider pushing your application for regular consideration (if that is possible in your case), or submit the application as is and still study for a retake in case you don’t get in. If you decide to study for a retake, I recommend that you take a good look at your study materials and approach, because it’s apparent that something isn’t working for you! This blog post can help you think through some of those things.
      I know that this is a difficult decision, and I wish I had a more concrete answer for you! You’ll have to do whatever you think is best. Good luck!

  6. Rouzbeh Rahai February 7, 2018 at 6:42 pm #

    Hello,

    I applied to programs in Education and the Social Sciences. My target schools have average scores of 158 Verbal, 152 Quant, and 4.5 AW. My best GRE Scores are 154 Verbal, 160 Quant, and 5 AW. Would my lower than average Verbal score be a limiting factor despite my strengths (relative to the target average scores) in the other two categories? Or would a committee compare my overall score?

    Thank You!

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert February 7, 2018 at 7:43 pm #

      Hi Rouzbeh,

      Unfortunately, this is a difficult call to make! Our expertise is in test prep, not admissions advice, so take anything I say with a grain of salt 🙂

      Grad admissions committees have a lot of different factors to consider, including work experience, academic standing, and all of the other components of your application. It’s important to remember that this is an average score and not a required score, which means that they do accept students with lower scores. I don’t think that your lower verbal score will be a huge red flag for the admissions committee, but they are also not necessarily transparent about their process and requirements. In situations like this, you just have to trust that you are a strong candidate and that your application can speak for itself 🙂

  7. Aaditya January 2, 2018 at 10:36 am #

    I scored 280 in gre. I completed my BSc in chemistry with 66.8%. I decided to do chemical engineering.

    • Faez Ahmmed May 8, 2018 at 11:57 am #

      In which University, you are studying? please tell me.

  8. Davis December 29, 2017 at 6:44 am #

    I just took the gre and I scored a 155 in both sections . Looking to apply for a masters degree at the university of south Florida. The required scores are 155 for quant and 149 for verbal. Tho I met the requirements, I’m still not too confident. Should I retake the test ?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert December 29, 2017 at 12:21 pm #

      Hi Davis,

      This depends on a lot of different factors, and unfortunately there is no easy answer! Different schools analyze GRE schools in different ways. USF might like to see stronger GRE scores, or they might just be looking for minimum scores which you already reached. A higher GRE score might help to offset a poor GPA, lack of work experience or other weak spot in your application, but studying for a retake can be an unnecessary distraction that keeps you from crafting a strong application. I recommend that you do some more research about the school and ask current students or send an email to an admissions counselor. Try to get a sense about how USF analyzes GRE scores and what they are looking for in their applicants. Good luck 🙂

  9. Manish Soni December 22, 2017 at 10:35 pm #

    Hi, I want to pursue Masters in Computer Science.I have GRE scores Quant:156 and Verbal:145.Can I make into top 50 colleges in the US?Can you give some suggestions?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert December 23, 2017 at 1:58 pm #

      Your GRE scores are in relatively low percentiles, with your Verbal score below the 50th percentile, and your QUant score in the low 60s for percentile. So on the strength of your GRE score alone, you probably couldn’t get into a top 50 college. While I do recommend that you retake the exam to get into a top school, it’s also important to remember that top schools seldom accept you on the strength of your GRE score alone. If you ahve strong work experience, published research or papers, or other noteworthy accomplishments, top schools may still consider you.

      For more information on where your current scores lie, see our posts on GRE score percentiles and GRE scores for top universities.

  10. Akil October 25, 2017 at 7:15 pm #

    Hi,
    I am a PhD aspirant and have started preparing for my GRE now. My target schools are the Ivy League business schools. Please help me understand what would be a good score (section wise) for me considering my specialization would be in Strategy/Management

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert October 27, 2017 at 11:43 am #

      Hi Akil,

      Our expertise is in test prep, not admissions advice–so I can’t answer your question with 100% certainty, but I can direct you to some resources that can help 🙂 You can get a good sense of what Ivy league schools look for in this blog post: https://magoosh.com/gre/2013/gre-scores-for-business-schools/. I also encourage you to check out the schools’ website and make sure that they accept the GRE–if you aren’t sure, you can consider the GMAT test: https://magoosh.com/gre/2014/gre-vs-gmat/ I hope this helps!

    • Ammon Lam November 30, 2017 at 9:23 pm #

      Hi Akil,

      You should remember that to get into an Ivy League school for a PhD, GRE score is less important when compared to your recommendation letter or research experience.

      Having said that almost everyone in those program have a perfect quant score anyway.

      • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
        Magoosh Test Prep Expert December 1, 2017 at 11:25 am #

        Ammom, while what you’ve said is often true of Ivy League schools (and other hghly competitive non-Ivies), it’s also important to remember that every school and individual program has their own GRE preferences and requirements. So the GRE can be more important in some top degree programs than in others.

  11. Opemipo October 17, 2017 at 1:43 pm #

    Hi, my Cgpa is 3.75/5.0. I want to apply for aerospace engineering in a Canadian university. Although I have not applied for GRE, can I write GRE now and still apply for 2019 session

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert October 18, 2017 at 9:57 am #

      Hi Opemipo! GRE scores are valid for 5 years, so you can take it when it best suits you. 🙂

  12. Shailesh October 17, 2017 at 3:40 am #

    Hi,

    I got a score of 165 in quant, 145 in verbal, and 4 in AWA. What are my chances of getting into a good university? Can you please name a few universities as well.

    Thanks!

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert October 18, 2017 at 9:54 am #

      Hi Shailesh,

      We cannot provide you a list of suitable universities because we are not admissions consultants and we know nothing about you and your career goals. I recommend looking into top programs in the field you want to enter and see what they require for admissions. There are probably schools that would happily admit you with this score, but you have to decide if those are the schools you’re aiming for. Good luck! 🙂

  13. Enrique October 14, 2017 at 3:17 pm #

    Hello, I took GRE yesterday and got 165 for verbal and 163 for quantitative. Since I plan to apply for PhD in computer science, I’m a bit worried that my quantitative score is not up to the requirements. Do you think I need to give GRE another try to get a better score?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert October 18, 2017 at 9:56 am #

      Hi Enrique,

      There are most definitely schools that will admit you, but you have to decide if they are the schools you want to attend. Have you done some research to see what your dream programs expect? In the end, if you believe you can improve upon your score and you have the resources to prepare for a retake, it would behoove you to do so. Good luck! 🙂

  14. Dano October 1, 2017 at 1:49 pm #

    Hey,
    I scored a 155 in my Quantitative and a 149 in Verbal. My exam center had network connectivity issues that made me stop the test after my quant which came immediately after my essays, only after to continue after an hour and a half of being idle. I believe I can score up to a 155 in Verbal and a 166 in quantitative and I my CGPA is 4.87/5.0. Should I retake the GRE? I want to apply to engineering graduate school.

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert October 9, 2017 at 10:27 am #

      Hi Dano,

      If you believe you can improve your score, it is well worth resitting the exam. Your scores right now are not as competitive as the scores you told me you think you can get. Good luck! 🙂

      • Yosef October 16, 2017 at 8:40 am #

        Well , just got out of the test centre ,

        am an architectural technologist working in a top 20 firm with around 3 years of work Exp .

        Had prepared, pretty rigorously I must say , for the past 3 months . Self study with a lot of focus on math and minimal practice on the verbal section .

        The score I saw at the end of the session was verbal -165 and quant – 160 .( strange, considering I spent about four hours in total on verbal )

        Think I got a brain fade of sorts during the quants section and screwed up a couple of easy ones .

        So considering , I got an average quant score . Do you reckon it would be worth my time (and energy ) to give it another go ?

        Iam looking at 165 in quant , and I know where I messed up .

        Or is a 160 in quant won’t be a hindrance come admission time ( my program of interest is a hybrid one , a bit of engineering with design )

        Any input would be great .

        And if I were to invest in your self study program , do I get a money back guarantee if I don’t improve in the next attemp as advertised ?, do I qualify ?

        • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
          Magoosh Test Prep Expert October 18, 2017 at 1:36 pm #

          Hi Yosef,

          Sorry to hear that your GRE score wasn’t quite what you’d hoped in Quant. That sounds disappointing. Based on what you’ve told me, this sounds like a minor slip-up on your part, and it does sound like you can get more than 160 in Quant. It also sounds like you may have a chance at 165 or higher if you retake the test. So I’d say a retake is worth it, provided you have time for one. 🙂

          And yes, with a previous GRE score in hand, you meet the basic qualifications for our refund guarantee. If you decide sign up, just be sure to read and follow our Score Guarantee instructions.

  15. Chels September 20, 2017 at 3:14 pm #

    I have a question about the scoring of the GRE..so I took an ETS practice test, and I got a 149 (35 percentile) on my Quantitative score. I checked my answers throughout the whole test and I found out I got half of the math questions wrong and half of them right. So, how did I get a 35 percentile score if I got half of the math questions right?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert September 21, 2017 at 10:16 am #

      Hi Chels,

      The percentile is how you rank against other test takers, so you performed better than 35% of the test takers with the score you got. It has nothing to do with the percent correct you got (other than how this helps you compare to all other students). I hope that clarifies!

  16. Kartik September 2, 2017 at 7:39 am #

    Hi I scored 170 in quant and 146 in verbal. I am planning to apply for colleges in US. Is a low verbal score going to hurt me. I am planning to pursue data analysis as a major field.

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert September 5, 2017 at 5:26 pm #

      Hi Kartik,

      There is no definitive answer, so you will have to see how individual schools treat the verbal score. Any school that doesn’t have a minimum verbal score will be fine with what you earned. 🙂

  17. Harika Reddy P August 1, 2017 at 6:18 pm #

    I scored 315 on GRE ( V-155, Q-160) but 3.0 in AWA. Is my AWA score bad to apply for Master’s in Biological sciences, esp. Molecular biology in the top #15-30 universities?
    Should I retake the test?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert August 4, 2017 at 8:57 pm #

      Hi Harika,

      That depends on the program. Have you done some research to see how they handle AWA scores? You may be lucky and not need them, but you may also find they require a minimum of 4.0 for admission.

  18. Deepank July 23, 2017 at 11:48 am #

    I have 160 QA and 152 VA. I am looking for MS in CS from USA. Should i reconsider giving GRE again for higher quant score or can i get admit from Good clges.
    I have 32 mnth exp with Accenture. 66.7% in grad

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert July 26, 2017 at 9:06 pm #

      Hi Deepank,

      The answer to this depends heavily on the schools you want to attend. Have you researched admission requirements for programs you are interested in? Seeing how you stack up to real requirements can be super helpful as you determine what to do next. 🙂

  19. Andy July 10, 2017 at 12:50 pm #

    Hello,

    I’m thinking about applying to Political Science/Public Policy graduate programs. I got a 170 V and a 159 Q. Given my intended field of graduate study, does it make sense at all to retake to try to get a higher Q score? While I’ll probably only apply to the top 10-15 programs, I don’t think I’ll apply for at least a few cycles and should thus have enough time to retake, if it makes sense to do so.

    In other words, how much do graduate programs related to political science and policy care about the GRE Q score?

    Thanks in advance for your response,
    Andrew

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert July 10, 2017 at 4:36 pm #

      Hi Andrew,

      First of all, congrats on such a stellar GRE score! I can tell that you worked hard and it showed 🙂

      Our expertise is in test prep, not admissions advice, so I’m afraid that I can only give you general advice on this question. According to this blog post on Social Science GRE scores, you are well within the score range for top Political Science Schools. However, you may want to do some research to narrow down your target schools before you decide to re-take the GRE. We also have this handy flowchart to help you make this decision: Retaking the GRE. Best of luck as you make your decision, and congrats again on an amazing score!

  20. Ayesha July 1, 2017 at 9:52 pm #

    HI,
    I’m planning on doing Master’s in Applied Nutrition from Canada or Usa. I’d like to know if GRE subject exams are necessary and if so- Do I have to necessarily write all subjects or I can select specific subjects (like eliminate maths?) or is GRE General exam enough?

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert July 4, 2017 at 10:48 am #

      Hi Ayesha,

      Unfortunately, we don’t have nearly as much expertise and experience in graduate school admissions as we do with test prep, so I’m afraid we can’t be of much help. However, for your specific program question, I would recommend that you reach out to a few of your target programs and ask about admission requirements. This will be the best source for an accurate and immediate response. I hope this helps, and I’m sorry we could not be of more help in this regard. Best of luck! 🙂

  21. R Vijaykumar June 27, 2017 at 5:52 am #

    Your acceptance will depend on the subject and the school. Wharton gets much better scores and a great deal will now depend on your statement of interest given the low scores. For State College and social science subjects, you might do better but again, recommendations matter a great deal. Finally, of course, luck on student representation from different regions and your ability to bear your course costs might work to your advantage. This is from my experience but I got much better scores – maxed, but there were other issues involved in my case. Best of luck.

  22. Sourav June 22, 2017 at 11:44 am #

    hey i want to take admission in Math PHD ,can you tell me whether GRE subject test is enough or i have to take GRE general test?

    also please tell me TOEFL or IELTS will be better for getting chance

    thank you

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert June 23, 2017 at 5:23 am #

      Hi Sourav,

      Happy to help 🙂 While the exact application requirements vary based on the program, most US-based programs require the GRE General Test as well as the GRE Mathematics Subject Test. Additionally, typically programs will accept both TOEFL or IELTS scores, without a preference as to which exam you take. However, and as I mentioned, these requirements are specific to individual programs and universities. So, you will want to check the requirements of the programs you’re interested in to make sure you take the correct exams. 🙂 I hope this helps! Happy studying 😀

  23. KE May 17, 2017 at 8:42 am #

    Hello!
    I took the GRE last August and scored 152 quantitative and 156 verbal. I retook the GRE (and admittedly did not do my best) receiving scores of 154 quantitative and 154 verbal.

    I am applying to PA school, and most of the minimum scores are pretty average where verbal scores are expected to be slightly higher than quantitative.

    I was hoping you could give me advice on which scores I should send to programs or if I should send both. Because I did not do as well as I wanted to, I am planning on retaking the GRE, but it may not be in time for early consideration for admission.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert May 17, 2017 at 8:56 am #

      I think it would not be bad to send both scores; they show relative stability in ability and neither one shows you in a particularly bad light. Of course, if you could get a substantially higher score, I would support that one and not the others, but if you run out of time to get a new score, the ones you have work together fine. 🙂


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