GRE Scores for Education Programs

Each year, more and more educators decide to bolster their credentials and expand their teaching reach. For many primary and secondary schools, a masters degree is already a requirement for the job. Doctoral degrees in education are becoming more essential for advancement into leadership roles. To get into these programs, you’ve almost always got to take the GRE. So what score will you need to get in?

Education GRE Scores by Intended Program

The scores below are intended majors. What does “intended” program mean? It simply means that that these are the average scores of test-takers planning on applying to graduate school in a specific education program. You’ll see differences in average scores across these different specific fields. Keep in mind that these are the average scores of anyone who took the GRE and indicated going into Education. This is not a snapshot of scores of accepted Master’s or PhD students in Education.

Verbal
Quantitative
AWA
All
150
148
3.8
Administration
150
148
3.7
Curriculum and Instruction
151
148
3.9
Early Childhood
146
146
3.3
Elementary
149
147
3.6
Evaluation and Research
151
148
3.8
Higher
152
149
4.0
Secondary
154
151
4.0
Special
148
145
3.4
Student Counseling and Personnel Services
149
146
3.7
Other
152
151
3.8

Average GRE Scores for Education, Top 30 Programs

The US News and World Report publishes data on the top graduate programs in education. Here are the average GRE Verbal and Quantitative scores for students admitted to the top 30 doctoral programs.

Rank
School
Average GRE Verbal Score
1 (tie)
Teacher’s College–Columbia University
160
1 (tie)
University of Wisconsin–Madison
159
3 (tie)
University of California–Los Angeles
156
3 (tie)
University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
161
5 (tie)
Northwestern University
164
5 (tie)
Vanderbilt University
163
7
University of Pennsylvania
160
8 (tie)
Harvard University
161
8 (tie)
Johns Hopkins University
158
8 (tie)
New York University
159
8 (tie)
Stanford University
164
8 (tie)
University of Texas–Austin
N/A
8 (tie)
University of Virginia
156
14 (tie)
Florida State University
154
14 (tie)
University of California–Berkeley
156
16
University of Florida
155
17 (tie)
Arizona State University
147
17 (tie)
University of California–Irvine
162
17 (tie)
University of Oregon
149
20
University of Kansas–Lawrence
151
21 (tie)
Michigan State University
152
21 (tie)
Ohio State University
155
23 (tie)
Boston College
157
23 (tie)
University of Washington
156
25 (tie)
University of Maryland–College Park
157
25 (tie)
University of Minnesota–Twin Cities
158
25 (tie)
University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
154
25 (tie)
Virginia Commonwealth University
154
29
University of South Carolina
152
30 (tie)
North Carolina State University–Raleigh
154
30 (tie)
University of Georgia
152
30 (tie)
University of Iowa
155
30 (tie)
University of Missouri
154

What Can We Take Away from Education Programs’ Average GRE Scores?

As expected, if you’re aiming for an upper tier education program, a good GRE score for you is going to be different than if your desired program just squeaked into the top 100. For the top schools, your verbal reasoning score would likely need to be in the 158+ range to be a competitive candidate, depending on other application factors.

There are many factors that go into getting a graduate school acceptance. But, as programs become more competitive and more people apply, a strong GRE score can help to make sure you have the strongest application possible. Need help getting started? First, consider using a Magoosh study plan. Then give our free trial a spin. Remember, the Verbal section of the GRE generally takes longer to improve than the Quant, so don’t waste another day and get started now!

Author

  • Chris Swimmer

    Chris Swimmer is an analyst at Magoosh who divides his time between marketing and research projects and helping folks out with their math hang ups while studying for the GRE and the GMAT.

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