offers hundreds of GMAT video lessons and practice questions. Go there now.
Sign up or log in to Magoosh GMAT.

6 Month GMAT Study Schedule

 

OK, you are starting more or less from scratch, and you want to prepare for the GMAT in six months.  You need a strategic plan to organize yourself.  Here it is.

Resources to have:

1) the GMAC Office Guide to the GMAT (OG13). (Don’t write in the book: write everything on separate paper so you can go back and do problems again with a fresh start.)

2) The code in the back of the OG will give you access to GMAC’s IR website with 50 IR practice questions.

3) a Premium subscription to Magoosh

4) the Magoosh mobile app for your iPhone or Android

5) The Magoosh GMAT eBook

6) The Magoosh IR eBook

7) Two volumes of the GMAC’s released GMATs, the “Paper Tests” books, available at http://www.mba.com/store/product-info.aspx?productid=5 (buy the third volume there if you would like even more practice).

8) a journal or notebook (yes, a physical hard copy item)

9) the two online forums:

(a) GMAT Club

(b) Beat the GMAT

These are great places to ask questions about anything GMAT related, or simply to check out the discussions and see how others are preparing

10) a good 1-2 hours a day, for five days a week, and then a good 3-4 stint on the weekend (“Day Six”) — with a day off on the weekend as well. If you would rather free up some week nights, and move some of the material into the other weekend day, you are welcome to do that.  Note: Many folks find that each day’s assignments take 1-2 hours, although times to complete them will vary for different students.

11) Buy at least one book in the Manhattan GMAT 10-volume series of GMAT Strategy Guides.  It is an excellent prep source.  Any one volume of the set will give you access to their 6 online GMAT CAT practice tests.

12) Recommended but not required: all the volumes of MGMAT series.  It’s expensive, but if you are eager to do as much prep as you can in the next six months, you could add working through those books to this schedule.

Notes:

This is a twenty-four week plan.  Six calendar months are typically closer to 26 weeks, so if you actually have six calendar months to prepare, that’s great.  If you have a wedding or a camping trip or something in the middle, you could just skip a week, and do it later.  Alternately, following the plan straight through would leave you more time for the concentrated review I recommend at the end of the twenty-four weeks.

Also, as much as possible, get enough sleep during this six month period.  REM sleep plays an important role in encoding long term memory, and in an eight hour period of sleep, the last hour has the most REM.  If you are getting 7 hours/night instead of 8 hours/night, you are depriving your brain of one of its most powerful systems for learning and remembering.  Caffeine and energy drinks will keep you feeling awake if you don’t get enough sleep, but they don’t do bupkis to replace the lost opportunity to encode more information into long term memory.

 

Abbreviations

OG = the GMAC Official Guide

PS = Problem Solving, the multiple-choice math questions

DS = Data Sufficiency math questions

RC = Reading Comprehension verbal question

SC = Sentence Correction verbal question

CR = Critical Reasoning verbal question

IR = Integrated Reasoning questions

AWA = the Analytical Writing Assessment, the essay-writing section

MGMAT = Manhattan GMAT

NYT = the New York Times

WSJ = the Wall Street Journal

TEM = The Economist Magazine

 

Week One

1) Go to http://www.mba.com/the-gmat/test-structure-and-overview.aspx, and read about the structure of the GMAT.  Click on each subsection on that page, to read about the individual sections.

2) Take the Diagnostic Test, found toward the beginning of the OG.   Grade it the same day, but go over the explanations the next day.  For questions you got right, simply skim the explanation to verify that you go the question right for the right reason.  If you got the question wrong, read the explanation carefully, writing in your journal any math/verbal concept you didn’t know or understand, as well as anything about the question type that you didn’t understand.  (That may take a couple days if you got a lot wrong.)

3) To get a sense of the layout of the test, in the OG, read the introductory sections to Problem Solving, Data Sufficiency, Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction.  Read the entire Integrated Reasoning section.  Read the introductory sections to the Analytical Writing Assessment, and skim the question prompts to get a sense of the variety

4) In the OG, read the Math Review, taking notes in your journal on anything new, rusty, or unfamiliar.  If math is your strength, you can probably just skim these pages, getting a sense of what the range of GMAT math is.  If math is not your thing, this may take some time.

5) Read The Magoosh GMAT eBook.  Read the entire book from cover to cover.

NOTE: if going over what you got wrong on the Diagnostic Test and/or reading through the Math Review turns out to be particularly time-consuming, that can fill the time on Day 6 of this first week.  If those were not time-consuming, you get some extra free weekend time in the first week.

 

Week Two:

NOTE: spread out the problems and video watching throughout the week in whatever way works best for you.

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

Intro to the GMAT: all ten videos, or as many as are needed

In Math: the first five videos

In Verbal: under RC, the first three videos

In Verbal: under SC, the first five videos

In Verbal: under CR, the first three videos

In AWA: all five videos

NOTE: The information in the Magoosh videos may be review for you, or childishly easy for you, or very challenging brand new information for you.  Some folk will find the verbal information obvious and the math hard-going, and other folks will have the reverse experience.  If the material is relatively easy for you, feel free to click to the end and simply read the summary.  If the material is new to you, take notes on what you are learning in your journal, and if possible, watch that video a second time.

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

8 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

NOTE: As soon as you do a batch of OG questions, correct them right away, and look the explanations.  If you got the question right, you need only skim the explanation to verify that you got it right for the right reason.  If you got the question wrong, read the explanation carefully, and take notes in your journal on what concepts or what aspect of the question you need to understand better.  For all the math questions in the OG, you will find video solutions available on the Magoosh YouTube channel.  If you don’t understand any given question after the various explanations available, post it in the forums seeking an explanation, or email us at Magoosh.

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

NOTE: After each Magoosh question is a video explanation.  If you got the question right, just skim the text summary of the video to verify you understand it.  If you got the question wrong, watch the video explanation right away.  If you don’t understand any given question after the explanation, post it in the forums seeking an explanation, or email us at Magoosh.

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

FINAL NOTE FOR WEEK TWO: In this week, there will be a slightly larger dose of Magoosh lesson videos.  Not coincidentally, there is also no special long “Day 6″ assignment.   My understanding is that either some of the extra video watching, or some of the practice questions, will get shunted to Day 6 of this week.

 

Week Three:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next seven videos

In Verbal: the last ten CR videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Today, you are going to write two essays, half an hour each.  In OG, in the section “Analysis of an Argument Sample Topics,” pick two Argument sample prompts at random (or have someone pick them for you), and for each, take 30 minutes to write an essay.

Now that you have these essays, what do you do with them?  If you have a friend or mentor who is a gifted writer, see if they would read the essays for you an critique them. If they are willing, you can show them the assessment criteria in the OG, and ask them to follow it.  Alternately, you can upload your essays in the online forms and ask for feedback.

2) In the OG, read the Integrated Reasoning section

3) In The Magoosh GMAT eBook, read the IR section

4) Read the entire Magoosh IR eBook.

 

Week Four:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next nine videos

In Verbal: the last seven RC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take one of the practice GMATs from the GMAC “Paper Test” volumes. Go through the answers after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong. If you can’t figure out why you got the question wrong, or can’t figure out the correct solution, post the question in one of the online forums, or ask us at Magoosh.

For the two essay questions, you can skip the “Analyze an Issue” essay, and just do the “Analyze an Argument” essay. Do not write the essay on paper. Take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions. Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections. Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT. Note how your sleep the night before affects your work. Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration. Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Five:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

a) Today, you are going to write two essays, half an hour each.  In OG, in the section “Analysis of an Argument Sample Topics,” pick two Argument sample prompts at random (or have someone pick them for you), and for each, take 30 minutes to write an essay.

These essays you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

b) Go to GMAC’s IR website — the code in the back of your OG should give you full access to this site.  Do the first 12 IR questions, setting for yourself a 30 minute limit.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question.

 

 

Week Six:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

 

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take one of the practice GMATs from the GMAC “Paper Test” volumes. Go through the answers after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong. If you can’t figure out why you got the question wrong, or can’t figure out the correct solution, post the question in one of the online forums, or ask us at Magoosh.

For the two essay questions, you can skip the “Analyze an Issue” essay, and just do the “Analyze an Argument” essay. Do not write the essay on paper. Take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions. Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections. Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT. Note how your sleep the night before affects your work. Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration. Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Seven:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

a) Today, you are going to write two essays, half an hour each.  In OG, in the section “Analysis of an Argument Sample Topics,” pick two Argument sample prompts at random (or have someone pick them for you), and for each, take 30 minutes to write an essay.

These essays you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

b) Go GMAC’s IR website.  Do the next 12 IR questions, setting for yourself a 30 minute limit.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question.

 

Week Eight:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take one of the practice GMATs from the GMAC “Paper Test” volumes. Go through the answers after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong. If you can’t figure out why you got the question wrong, or can’t figure out the correct solution, post the question in one of the online forums, or ask us at Magoosh.

For the two essay questions, you can skip the “Analyze an Issue” essay, and just do the “Analyze an Argument” essay. Do not write the essay on paper. Take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions. Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections. Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT. Note how your sleep the night before affects your work. Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration. Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Nine:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

a) Today, you are going to write two essays, half an hour each.  In OG, in the section “Analysis of an Argument Sample Topics,” pick two Argument sample prompts at random (or have someone pick them for you), and for each, take 30 minutes to write an essay.

These essays you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

b) Go GMAC’s IR website.  Do the next 13 IR questions, setting for yourself a 33 minute limit.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question.

 

Week Ten:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take one of the practice GMATs from the GMAC “Paper Test” volumes. Go through the answers after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong. If you can’t figure out why you got the question wrong, or can’t figure out the correct solution, post the question in one of the online forums, or ask us at Magoosh.

For the two essay questions, you can skip the “Analyze an Issue” essay, and just do the “Analyze an Argument” essay. Do not write the essay on paper. Take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions. Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections. Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT. Note how your sleep the night before affects your work. Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration. Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Eleven:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

a) Today is the last time you are going to write two essays, half an hour each.  In OG, in the section “Analysis of an Argument Sample Topics,” pick two Argument sample prompts at random (or have someone pick them for you), and for each, take 30 minutes to write an essay.

These essays you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

b) Go GMAC’s IR website.  Do the last 13 IR questions, setting for yourself a 33 minute limit.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question.

 

Week Twelve:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Integrated Reasoning: all seventeen videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take one of the practice GMATs from the GMAC “Paper Test” volumes. Go through the answers after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong. If you can’t figure out why you got the question wrong, or can’t figure out the correct solution, post the question in one of the online forums, or ask us at Magoosh.

For the two essay questions, you can skip the “Analyze an Issue” essay, and just do the “Analyze an Argument” essay. Do not write the essay on paper. Take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions. Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections. Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT. Note how your sleep the night before affects your work. Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration. Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Thirteen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take one of the practice GMATs from the GMAC “Paper Test” volumes. Go through the answers after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong. If you can’t figure out why you got the question wrong, or can’t figure out the correct solution, post the question in one of the online forums, or ask us at Magoosh.

For the two essay questions, you can skip the “Analyze an Issue” essay, and just do the “Analyze an Argument” essay. Do not write the essay on paper. Take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions. Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections. Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT. Note how your sleep the night before affects your work. Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration. Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Fourteen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

a) Go to http://manhattangmat.com/access.cfm, and register using the code in the back of any of the 10 MGMAT books.  This will give you access to the six MGMAT CATs.

b) Take the first full length GMAT CAT on the MGMAT website.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

That software does not include an AWA question.  To simulate a full GMAT, begin by selecting randomly a prompt from the back of the OG, and then take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.  Then, take the rest of the GMAT using that software.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Fifteen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT CAT on the MGMAT website.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

That software does not include an AWA question.  To simulate a full GMAT, begin by selecting randomly a prompt from the back of the OG, and then take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.  Then, take the rest of the GMAT using that software.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Sixteen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT CAT on the MGMAT website.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

That software does not include an AWA question.  To simulate a full GMAT, begin by selecting randomly a prompt from the back of the OG, and then take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.  Then, take the rest of the GMAT using that software.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Seventeen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next seven SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT CAT on the MGMAT website.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

That software does not include an AWA question.  To simulate a full GMAT, begin by selecting randomly a prompt from the back of the OG, and then take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.  Then, take the rest of the GMAT using that software.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Eighteen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next seven videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT CAT on the MGMAT website.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

That software does not include an AWA question.  To simulate a full GMAT, begin by selecting randomly a prompt from the back of the OG, and then take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.  Then, take the rest of the GMAT using that software.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Nineteen:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next seven SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Go to GMAC’s IR website — the code in the back of your OG should give you full access to this site.  Do questions #25 – 37.  Set a 33 minute time limit. Just answer the questions and move on during that time.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question, taking notes on whatever you found difficult.

5) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

6) Day Six Assignment:

Go to http://www.mba.com/the-gmat/download-free-test-preparation-software.aspx, download the free software.

Take one full length GMAT on the GMAC software.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

For the essay question in the software, do not write the essay in that program.  Write down the prompt, exit the software, and take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal.

 

Week Twenty:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next seven videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Go back to GMAC’s IR website.  Reset all questions.  Do questions #13 – 24.  Set a 30 minute time limit. Just answer the questions and move on during that time.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question, taking notes on whatever you found difficult.

5) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

6) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT on the GMAC software.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

For the essay question in the software, do not write the essay in that program.  Write down the prompt, exit the software, and take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Twenty-One:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next seven SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Go back to GMAC’s IR website.  Reset all questions.  Do questions #38 – 50.  Set a 33 minute time limit. Just answer the questions and move on during that time.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question, taking notes on whatever you found difficult.

5) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

6) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT on the GMAC software.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

For the essay question in the software, do not write the essay in that program.  Write down the prompt, exit the software, and take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Twenty-Two:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next seven videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

8 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Go back to GMAC’s IR website.  Reset all questions.  Do questions #1-12.  Set a 30 minute time limit. Just answer the questions and move on during that time.  When you are done, go back and read carefully the full explanation for each question, taking notes on whatever you found difficult.

5) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

6) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT on the GMAC software.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

For the essay question in the software, do not write the essay in that program.  Write down the prompt, exit the software, and take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Twenty-Three:

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next eight videos

In Verbal: the next seven SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

6 DS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

5 SC questions

6 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT on the GMAC software.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

For the essay question in the software, do not write the essay in that program.  Write down the prompt, exit the software, and take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

Week Twenty-Four:

NOTE: the review process is starting to wind down.  At this point, we have already finished all RC 7 SC question in the Magoosh product, and all DS question in the OG.  During the course of this week, you will finish pretty much every other Magoosh & OG question.

1) In Magoosh, watch the following videos

In Math: the next seven videos

In Verbal: the next eight SC videos

2) In the OG, do

10 PS questions

6 SC questions

5 CR questions

1 RC passage and the associated questions

3) In Magoosh, do the following questions:

14 PS questions

6 DS questions

6 CR questions

4) Each day, search the WSJ for graphs and charts.  When you find a chart, skim the article to get the gist of it.  Then, study the chart carefully, making sure you understand how it supports the argument or analysis of the article.

5) Day Six Assignment:

Take another full length GMAT on the GMAC software.  Go through the entire solution after you are done, taking notes in your journal on anything you got wrong.

For the essay question in the software, do not write the essay in that program.  Write down the prompt, exit the software, and take 30 minutes to write the essay in a word processing program. This essay you will either share with a trusted friend or mentor, or post in the online forums asking for feedback.

As much as possible, try to mimic the GMAT conditions.  Give yourself relatively short breaks in between sections.  Only eat the kinds of snacks that you are planning to bring to the real GMAT.  Note how your sleep the night before affects your work.  Note how what you had for dinner the previous night and what you had to eat earlier that day affects your energy level and concentration.   Write any observations in your journal

 

After Week 24: Concentrated Review

At this point, if you have been following the schedule, you should have done every question in both Magoosh and in the OG at least once.  For remaining days until the test, keep up work on GMAT math and verbal.  Some suggestions for what to do:

1) Go back to OG questions you did a while ago, and do them again.  (This is why it was important not to write in the book)

2) Through selecting question type & difficulty on the “Dashboard”, do Magoosh problems over again, and see how you do a second time.

3) Keep reading the WSJ, looking for graphs to interpret

4) Keep watching for a second or third time 15 Magoosh lesson videos a week, on whatever topics you feel you need to review

5) Go to the online forums, looking for challenging questions that folks are asking.

6) An online search will always turn up additional batches of questions to practice.

7) If you feel you need it, devote one more evening to writing two more practice essays, from the topics listed in the OG

8 ) If you have another weekend day before the real GMAT, do a search for additional free GMATs you can do online.  Alternately, you can buy a book of 3 release paper versions of the GMAT from GMAC at http://www.mba.com/store/product-info.aspx?productid=5, and devote a weekend day to each one.

 

Day before the test:

1) No GMAT preparation all day

2) Eat a large, healthy, leisurely dinner – no alcohol!

3) Go to bed earlier than usual.

 

Day of test

1) ABSOLUTELY NO LAST-MINUTE GMAT PREPARATION!

2) Eat a large breakfast, full of protein

3) Do relaxing, fun activities to pass time until the test

 

Bring to the test

1) A liter of water

2) Healthy energy-packed snacks (nuts, protein bar, etc.)

3) On breaks, make sure to get up, move & stretch – moving & stretching the large muscles of the body (legs & torso) will get oxygen flowing throughout, which will help keep you awake and keep you thinking clearly.

For relaxation tips, see this post.

 

About the Author

Mike McGarry is a Content Developer for Magoosh with over 20 years of teaching experience and a BS in Physics and an MA in Religion, both from Harvard. He enjoys hitting foosballs into orbit, and despite having no obvious cranial deficiency, he insists on rooting for the NY Mets. Follow him on Google+!

30 Responses to 6 Month GMAT Study Schedule

  1. Richa May 15, 2014 at 10:34 pm #

    Dear Mike,

    Hope you are doing well. :)

    I will come straight to the point. :)

    Some courses that i want to apply for my graduate studies need GRE while others need GMAT. I gave my GRE last year and scored 320 (Q 169, V 151). I am taking GMAT this year in early September and am targeting a score of 750+.

    While going through the 3 months advanced study plan, i found that you have prescribed Manhattan 10 volume series. And as the plan progresses, there is more to do with these books and less of Magoosh videos. I can procure some of these books but getting the entire lot would be very expensive for me. Is there any alternate way?

    I do plan to get for sure Manhattan SC, CR, IR and even RC (with a little stretch on my pocket money though :P) guides for my verbal prep. And since I find myself very comfortable with Maths, i was thinking to use Magoosh Videos instead of doing Math from these guides, Will that be useful?

    The other idea i thought was to squeeze the 6 month plan into 4.5 months with 3-4 hour study on 6 days and additional 4-5 hours on the 7th day. I hope i am not overestimating things and hence need your expert advise here.

    You support is much appreciated.

    Thanks a bunch
    Richa

    • Mike
      Mike May 16, 2014 at 8:17 am #

      Dear Richa,
      I’m happy to respond. :-) First of all, perhaps you have been looking at a few different plans here. This particular six-month plan involves watching all the Magoosh videos twice, and I recommend getting one MGMAT book, simply to get the code for their CATs. If you want to get a few MGMAT books, that’s fine, but in this plan, I didn’t recommend buying the whole set. Also, if you look on GMAT Club, sometimes you will see the MGMAT books sold used for a low price. You will need one new one, for the CAT code, but the others you could probably find used.
      The Magoosh math videos will give you everything you need — if you also read through the content articles on the blog, that will give you another perspective, which will help to deepen your understanding.
      I think it’s find to compress this plan a little and fit it in 4-5 months. I would caution you about filling up all seven days of the week — the mind, like the body, needs down time. That’s not a waste of time: it’s actually part of a healthy learning process. If you do study all seven days, make sure that there is also ample rest, relaxation, and just plain fun as part of your week — having regular doses of that refreshment is vital for keeping the mind sharp.
      Finally, you have an ambitious target score. That’s great. The Magoosh video lessons & questions & video explanations & blog will give you everything you need. It will all pass in front of your eyes. Whether you can take that and get an elite score depends on your ability to focus, to remember, to learn and understand deeply, and to apply in creative out-of-the-box ways. Keep all this in mind as you learn: any half-hearted understanding is simply not enough. You need to know each and everything cold.
      Does all this make sense?
      Mike :-)

      • Richa May 18, 2014 at 2:59 am #

        Dear Mike,

        Thanks a ton for your sound advise.

        I had been contemplating between 3 months advanced plan and this 6 months plan. But after absorbing what you said, i believe i am very much clear on the study plan i should use.

        So thanks again.

        Richa

        • Mike
          Mike May 18, 2014 at 2:50 pm #

          Dear Richa,
          You are more than welcome, my friend. Best of luck to you!
          Mike :-)

  2. Nina March 28, 2014 at 10:23 am #

    Hi,

    Thank you very much for this plan. I’m planning to take the gmat test after 9 months. I’m gonna start by this 6 months plan and i want really to add the MGMAT 10-volume series to my studying. Is it better to study the MGMAT 10-volume in the 6 months with this plan or study them in the 3 extra months a lone? How much time I need to finish the 10 books?

    Thanks a lot

    • Mike
      Mike March 28, 2014 at 10:46 am #

      Dear Nina,
      Combining this plan with the MGMAT books is an excellent idea. When to do what? In general, I would say: the human brain best integrates information over time, with repeated exposures. Six hours of studying something in one sitting is not nearly as effective as six one-hour segments spaced over different days. The brain needs time to integrate and process, including the memory consolidation that happens in REM sleep.. Therefore, I would say — work the MGMAT books into the plan — that would involving fitting in about 1/2 a book per week. Going through them at a nice slow rate will give your brain a better chance of absorbing every nugget of wisdom they contain. Perhaps after you finish the books once slowly while going through this six month plan, you can revisit only volumes of that set and Magoosh videos in which you feel you need to get more.
      My only caution would be — this plan is designed to “climax” at the end: lots of GMATPrep tests immediately before the real test. If you plan to take the GMAT in 9 months, delay a bit the MGMAT CATs and the GMATPrep tests, the two high quality test sources, until closer to your test day. You could fill in with some lower quality tests earlier in the plan, just to practice your test-taking habits.
      Does all this make sense?
      Mike :-)

      • Nina March 28, 2014 at 11:06 am #

        Thanks a lot for your fast reply and explanation. It makes sense :)

        • Mike
          Mike March 28, 2014 at 1:03 pm #

          Dear Nina,
          You are quite welcome, my friend. Best of luck to you!
          Mike :-)

  3. Anmol Kukreja March 5, 2014 at 9:29 pm #

    Hi Mike

    I am planning to give my gmat in July/August 2014 because the applications for colleges will start in the month of september. So i am planning to start with the 6 months course, though i have just 5 months in hand…Please help.

    • Mike
      Mike March 6, 2014 at 10:45 am #

      Dear Anmol,
      Well, it’s easier to add than to subtract, so I will say: pick the three-month plan that works best for you. Start with a month of just watching the Magoosh videos, and maybe doing practice questions you find on this blog and on GMAT Club — the more recent blog articles here will have questions that aren’t in the Magoosh product. Do that for a month or six weeks, and then start the three-month plan from scratch — that way, you will see most of the Magoosh videos twice, which will reinforce your learning, and you will finish close to test time. Does this make sense?
      Mike :-)

      • Anmol Kukreja March 10, 2014 at 4:41 am #

        Hi Mike

        Thanks for your answer.Yes,it makes a lot of sense for me.Thanks for your time Mike.

        • Mike
          Mike March 10, 2014 at 10:25 am #

          Dear Anmol,
          You are more than welcome. Best of luck to you!
          Mike :-)

  4. Chris January 28, 2014 at 6:48 pm #

    Mike,

    I am currently in my UG and have about 8 months to study for the GMAT. I am aiming for at 620-650. How hard is it going to be to get in the mid to low 600’s if I spend at least an hour a day for 8 months?

    Thanks,
    Chris

    • Mike
      Mike January 29, 2014 at 1:14 pm #

      Chris,
      First of all, I’ll recommend this blog post:
      http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/how-hard-is-the-gmat/
      The frustrating answer is: it depends. If you can sit down, take a GMAT cold, and already get a score in this range, then its very easy. If you take a cold GMAT, and get in the 400’s, then getting there will be hard. I would definitely recommend taking a practice GMAT, say in a used book, with virtually no preparation, just to give yourself a sense of your baseline.
      Mike :-)

  5. Stewart January 8, 2014 at 8:11 pm #

    Mike,

    If a reader were to have a longer time frame, say maybe one to two years, would it be practical to start studying the 6 month plan and redo the magoosh study plan once finished?

    I personally won’t be taking it for 2 years but I would like to get a head start. What would you recommend the best path be for me?

    Thanks

    Stew

    • Mike
      Mike January 9, 2014 at 9:26 am #

      Dear Stew,
      I always like a student who plans ahead! Taking this long approach to the GMAT gives you an overwhelming advantage compared to most other folks. A couple suggestions. First of all, don’t touch a calculator for the next couple years — get in the habit of doing all kinds of math (tips, gas mileage, grocery totals) in your head. Also, develop a habit of serious reading — good challenging academic material. See:
      http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-reading-list/
      Since you have the time, read through this entire free blog: if you can integrate every tip on this blog, you will be a GMAT superstar.
      I would also recommend: buy a cheap GMAT book, really anything you can find at a used book store, and just take a practice GMAT cold. Do that sometime soon. Understand, the score may not be a hyper-accurate prediction, but you will do this just to get a sense of your relative strengths and weaknesses. If there’s a particular question type or a particular content area that you find especially perplexing, perhaps you should do some focused work with that before you begin a formal study plan. Once you begin a formal plan, taking a year to go through this same six-month plan twice would be a very powerful and thorough way to prepare for the GMAT. If you have any further questions about additional resources as you prepare, you are welcome to solicit my advice in the Magoosh forum of GMAT Club:
      http://gmatclub.com/forum/magoosh-324/
      Best of luck to you, my friend.
      Mike :-)

  6. Sid November 14, 2013 at 1:49 pm #

    Hi Mike,
    This study schedule is incredibly helpful and I am so grateful to you all at magoosh.

    I am debating whether I should follow the 3 or 6 month study plan. I am intending to start applications in March 2014. If I follow the 3 month plan I would complete the GMAT before I start applications. This would also give me time to retake it if necessary. However, I scored a mediocre 420 on my first practice GMAT and I think a more in depth study plan (i.e. 6 months) may be necessary.

    What do you think?

    • Mike
      Mike November 14, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

      Dear Sid,
      It’s a bit hard to say without knowing your situation, but given that you have plenty of time before application deadlines next year, I would recommend the six-month plan, only because spending more time studying would give you a more thorough preparation.
      Mike :-)

      • Sid November 14, 2013 at 7:38 pm #

        Thank you! What would you say are the main differences between the 3 and 6 month schedule? It looks like you would take more practice tests in the 6 month version. I am asking because I think I’ll do the 3 month plan and then tack on more prep if I am not satisfied with my score. In that case, it would be helpful to know what to cover :)

        • Mike
          Mike November 15, 2013 at 9:46 am #

          Sid,
          The six month plan, in addition to more practice tests, has more reading and involves viewing the lesson videos twice, with each viewing a few months apart. If you want to do a three-month plan, then maybe another, I would suggest one of the first three three-month plans on the first round of studying, and then if you want more, follow the advanced three-month plan in the second round. Don’t underestimate outside reading as an important part of GMAT preparations. Does all this make sense?
          Mike :-)

          • Sid November 15, 2013 at 11:30 pm #

            That’s an excellent idea. When you say ‘outside reading’ are you referring to magazines, articles, newspapers, etcetera where you can read about real-life quant problems that are applicable to the GMAT (and b-school)?

  7. Quandra November 13, 2013 at 8:01 am #

    I have 8 of the Manhattan GMAT books. My question is how would I incorporate the Manhattan study material with the 6 month magoosh study guide?

    • Mike
      Mike November 13, 2013 at 10:23 am #

      Dear Quandra,
      This is a 24-week plan, so if you plan to work your way through 1/2 a book each week, that will get you through the whole set easily by the end, even leaving time for a second reading of anything you found difficult. Don’t worry about trying to coordinate MGMAT content with Magoosh content — just read the MGMAT books in any order. Hearing the same concepts explained in different ways at different times will actually help your brain to learn it more deeply.
      Mike :-)

  8. James Foley September 29, 2013 at 11:33 am #

    Mike,

    Thank you for the article I do appreciate it. When you say “starting more or less from scratch” are you assuming that I as a student have not done any GMAT prep? Or is there a base knowledge expectation beyond the BA degree and some years on the work force?

    • Mike
      Mike September 29, 2013 at 11:58 am #

      James,
      By “more or less from scratch”, I do mean: starting from a place where you know zero about the GMAT. I assume you have taken an SAT, way back at some point, so you are not brand new to standardized testing, and I assume you have a college degree and some work experience, but besides that, there is absolutely no minimum expectation. That’s where this schedule begins. Does this make sense?
      Mike :-)

      • James Foley October 11, 2013 at 7:46 pm #

        Mike,

        Thank you yes it does.

        • Mike
          Mike October 12, 2013 at 1:27 pm #

          James,
          You are quite welcome. Best of luck to you, my friend.
          Mike :-)


Magoosh blog comment policy: To create the best experience for our readers, we will approve and respond to comments that are relevant to the article, general enough to be helpful to other students, concise, and well-written! :) If your comment was not approved, it likely did not adhere to these guidelines. If you are a Premium Magoosh student and would like more personalized service, you can use the Help tab on the Magoosh dashboard. Thanks!

Leave a Reply