Free GMAT Diagnostic Tests (Verbal and Quantitative)

Curious about where you would stack up compared to others taking the GMAT test? Take our FREE GMAT Diagnostic Tests (Verbal and Quant) to gauge your skills on the GMAT exam. Answer explanations and a link to your recommended study plan will display at the end of each GMAT exam.

GMAT Quantitative Diagnostic

Enter your email below to start the Quant diagnostic, or scroll down to take the Verbal diagnostic right away! We recommend taking both the GMAT diagnostic tests together to get an accurate measure of your ability. For real, GMAT-like pacing, give yourself 25 minutes to complete each of the diagnostics (10 questions each).


 

GMAT Verbal Diagnostic

The GMAT Verbal questions come in the three formats: Sentence Correction, Critical Reasoning, and and Reading Comprehension.

Give yourself 25 minutes to complete this diagnostic. There are 10 questions total. Let’s get started!

 

 

Question 1 of 10

QUESTION 1


The questions in this group are based on the content of this passage.  After reading the passage, choose the best answer to each question.  Answer all questions following the passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.

Originally, scientists predicted small asteroids to be hard and rocky, as any loose surface material (called regolith) generated by impacts was expected to escape their weak gravity. Aggregate small bodies were not thought to exist, because the slightest sustained relative motion would cause them to separate. But observations and computer modeling are proving otherwise. Most asteroids larger than a kilometer are now believed to be composites of smaller pieces. Those imaged at high-resolution show evidence for copious regolith despite the weak gravity. Most of them have one or more extraordinarily large craters, some of which are wider than the mean radius of the whole body. Such colossal impacts would not just gouge out a crater—they would break any monolithic body into pieces. In short, asteroids larger than a kilometer across may look like nuggets of hard rock but are more likely to be aggregate assemblages—or even piles of loose rubble so pervasively fragmented that no solid bedrock is left.

The rubble hypothesis, proposed decades ago by scientists, lacked evidence, until the planetologist Schumaker realized that the huge craters on the asteroid Mathilde and its very low density could only make sense together: a porous body such as a rubble pile can withstand a battering much better than an integral object. It will absorb and dissipate a large fraction of the energy of an impact; the far side might hardly feel a thing. At first, the rubble hypothesis may appear conceptually troublesome. The material strength of an asteroid is nearly zero, and the gravity is so low one is tempted to neglect that too. The truth is neither strength nor gravity can be ignored. Paltry though it may be, gravity binds a rubble pile together. And anybody who builds sandcastles knows that even loose debris can cohere. Oft-ignored details of motion begin to matter: sliding friction, chemical bonding, damping of kinetic energy, etc. We are just beginning to fathom the subtle interplay of these minuscule forces.

The size of an asteroid should determine which force dominates. One indication is the observed pattern of asteroidal rotation rates. Some collisions cause an asteroid to spin faster; others slow it down. If asteroids are monolithic rocks undergoing random collisions, a graph of their rotation rates should show a bell-shaped distribution with a statistical “tail” of very fast rotators. If nearly all asteroids are rubble piles, however, this tail would be missing, because any rubble pile spinning faster than once every two or three hours fly apart. Recently, several astronomers discovered that all but five observed asteroids obey a strict rotation limit. The exceptions are all smaller than about 150 meters in diameter, with an abrupt cutoff for asteroids larger than 200 meters. The evident conclusion—that asteroids larger than 200 meters across are rubble piles—agrees with recent computer modeling of collisions. A collision can blast a large asteroid to bits, but those bits will usually be moving slower than their mutual escape velocity (the lowest velocity that a body must have in order to escape the orbit of a planet). Over several hours, gravity will reassemble all but the fastest pieces into a rubble.

How would the author of the passage most likely respond to the assertion of another scientist claiming that a crater greater than the radius of an asteroid is a result of an impact?

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 1 of 10

Question 2 of 10

QUESTION 2

The questions in this group are based on the content of this passage.  After reading the passage, choose the best answer to each question.  Answer all questions following the passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.

Originally, scientists predicted small asteroids to be hard and rocky, as any loose surface material (called regolith) generated by impacts was expected to escape their weak gravity. Aggregate small bodies were not thought to exist, because the slightest sustained relative motion would cause them to separate. But observations and computer modeling are proving otherwise. Most asteroids larger than a kilometer are now believed to be composites of smaller pieces. Those imaged at high-resolution show evidence for copious regolith despite the weak gravity. Most of them have one or more extraordinarily large craters, some of which are wider than the mean radius of the whole body. Such colossal impacts would not just gouge out a crater—they would break any monolithic body into pieces. In short, asteroids larger than a kilometer across may look like nuggets of hard rock but are more likely to be aggregate assemblages—or even piles of loose rubble so pervasively fragmented that no solid bedrock is left.

The rubble hypothesis, proposed decades ago by scientists, lacked evidence, until the planetologist Schumaker realized that the huge craters on the asteroid Mathilde and its very low density could only make sense together: a porous body such as a rubble pile can withstand a battering much better than an integral object. It will absorb and dissipate a large fraction of the energy of an impact; the far side might hardly feel a thing. At first, the rubble hypothesis may appear conceptually troublesome. The material strength of an asteroid is nearly zero, and the gravity is so low one is tempted to neglect that too. The truth is neither strength nor gravity can be ignored. Paltry though it may be, gravity binds a rubble pile together. And anybody who builds sandcastles knows that even loose debris can cohere. Oft-ignored details of motion begin to matter: sliding friction, chemical bonding, damping of kinetic energy, etc. We are just beginning to fathom the subtle interplay of these minuscule forces.

The size of an asteroid should determine which force dominates. One indication is the observed pattern of asteroidal rotation rates. Some collisions cause an asteroid to spin faster; others slow it down. If asteroids are monolithic rocks undergoing random collisions, a graph of their rotation rates should show a bell-shaped distribution with a statistical “tail” of very fast rotators. If nearly all asteroids are rubble piles, however, this tail would be missing, because any rubble pile spinning faster than once every two or three hours fly apart. Recently, several astronomers discovered that all but five observed asteroids obey a strict rotation limit. The exceptions are all smaller than about 150 meters in diameter, with an abrupt cutoff for asteroids larger than 200 meters. The evident conclusion—that asteroids larger than 200 meters across are rubble piles—agrees with recent computer modeling of collisions. A collision can blast a large asteroid to bits, but those bits will usually be moving slower than their mutual escape velocity (the lowest velocity that a body must have in order to escape the orbit of a planet). Over several hours, gravity will reassemble all but the fastest pieces into a rubble.

The primary purpose of the passage is to

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 2 of 10

Question 3 of 10

QUESTION 3

The questions in this group are based on the content of this passage.  After reading the passage, choose the best answer to each question.  Answer all questions following the passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage.

Originally, scientists predicted small asteroids to be hard and rocky, as any loose surface material (called regolith) generated by impacts was expected to escape their weak gravity. Aggregate small bodies were not thought to exist, because the slightest sustained relative motion would cause them to separate. But observations and computer modeling are proving otherwise. Most asteroids larger than a kilometer are now believed to be composites of smaller pieces. Those imaged at high-resolution show evidence for copious regolith despite the weak gravity. Most of them have one or more extraordinarily large craters, some of which are wider than the mean radius of the whole body. Such colossal impacts would not just gouge out a crater—they would break any monolithic body into pieces. In short, asteroids larger than a kilometer across may look like nuggets of hard rock but are more likely to be aggregate assemblages—or even piles of loose rubble so pervasively fragmented that no solid bedrock is left.

The rubble hypothesis, proposed decades ago by scientists, lacked evidence, until the planetologist Schumaker realized that the huge craters on the asteroid Mathilde and its very low density could only make sense together: a porous body such as a rubble pile can withstand a battering much better than an integral object. It will absorb and dissipate a large fraction of the energy of an impact; the far side might hardly feel a thing. At first, the rubble hypothesis may appear conceptually troublesome. The material strength of an asteroid is nearly zero, and the gravity is so low one is tempted to neglect that too. The truth is neither strength nor gravity can be ignored. Paltry though it may be, gravity binds a rubble pile together. And anybody who builds sandcastles knows that even loose debris can cohere. Oft-ignored details of motion begin to matter: sliding friction, chemical bonding, damping of kinetic energy, etc. We are just beginning to fathom the subtle interplay of these minuscule forces.

The size of an asteroid should determine which force dominates. One indication is the observed pattern of asteroidal rotation rates. Some collisions cause an asteroid to spin faster; others slow it down. If asteroids are monolithic rocks undergoing random collisions, a graph of their rotation rates should show a bell-shaped distribution with a statistical “tail” of very fast rotators. If nearly all asteroids are rubble piles, however, this tail would be missing, because any rubble pile spinning faster than once every two or three hours fly apart. Recently, several astronomers discovered that all but five observed asteroids obey a strict rotation limit. The exceptions are all smaller than about 150 meters in diameter, with an abrupt cutoff for asteroids larger than 200 meters. The evident conclusion—that asteroids larger than 200 meters across are rubble piles—agrees with recent computer modeling of collisions. A collision can blast a large asteroid to bits, but those bits will usually be moving slower than their mutual escape velocity (the lowest velocity that a body must have in order to escape the orbit of a planet). Over several hours, gravity will reassemble all but the fastest pieces into a rubble.

The reason that graphs of asteroid rotation rates lack the expected statistical tail associated with high rotational rates is that

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 3 of 10

Question 4 of 10

QUESTION 4

Critical Reasoning: Select the best of the answer choices given.  Over the past ten years, the population of Dismaston has grown five times as large as it was. During this time, the average income in the city has risen substantially, and a tremendous amount of capital has flowed into city. An independent audit found that, somewhat surprisingly, the number of violent felonies reported per year is now lower than it was ten years ago.

Each of the following statements below, if true, would explain the somewhat surprising finding EXCEPT:

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 4 of 10

Question 5 of 10

QUESTION 5

Sentence Correction: Choose the option that best completes the underlined part of the sentence.  Whereas both Europe and China use standard railroad gauge (1435 mm), Russia deliberately chose the wider "Russian gauge" (1520 mm) that gives greater side-to-side stability in railways cars and, more importantly, acts as a national defense, so that it would block a foreign army's supply line and preventing these bordering powers from invading by train.

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 5 of 10

Question 6 of 10

QUESTION 6

Critical Reasoning: Select the best of the answer choices given.  A luxury apartment condo recently opened up along the Biltmore’s waterfront. Within the first two months, 80% of the standard units in the first ten of the condo’s twelve stories were sold. Nonetheless, only two of the eight penthouses, all of which are located in the top two stories of the building, have sold. In order to sell the remaining six penthouses, the corporation that owns the property, should drop the rate of the penthouses by 20%.

Which of the following, if true, would argue against the proposal above?


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 6 of 10

Question 7 of 10

QUESTION 7

Sentence Correction: Choose the option that best completes the underlined part of the sentence.  Inaugurating the Romantic movement with its publication in 1798, the authors of the Lyrical Ballads were Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, who would later be named Britain's Poet Laureate.

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 7 of 10

Question 8 of 10

QUESTION 8

Critical Reasoning: Select the best of the answer choices given.  Egidio's Gym has been in operation for seven years, and offers regular weekly weight training and aerobic classes, as well as occasional programs in dance and martial arts. The gym has seen a surge of new members in the past twelve months, despite keeping the same membership fee over the past three years. Of the 450 current members, more than 250 have joined in the past year. Clearly, the membership of Egidio's Gym has risen a significant amount because of its superior facilities.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument depends?


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 8 of 10

Question 9 of 10

QUESTION 9

Sentence Correction: Choose the option that best completes the underlined part of the sentence.  Of all the things that Washington could have done in conducting the American Revolution, nevertheless the war against the British would not have succeeded without French intervention.

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 9 of 10

Question 10 of 10

QUESTION 10

Critical Reasoning: Select the best of the answer choices given.  At Funston Stores, a salesperson's salary is comprised solely of commissions from sales. A particular salesperson's annual salary was lower in 2009 than in 2008. In both years, all of this salesperson's sales were of only one item, product X, and he made the same number of product X sales in both years. The commission percentage for all Funston salespeople has remained unchanged over the past ten years.

The information above most strongly supports which of the following?


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 10 of 10


 

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How to Take the Magoosh GMAT Diagnostic Tests

You should allow yourself 25 minutes for the Quant Diagnostic Test and 25 minutes for the Verbal Diagnostic Test. And remember, these tests measure your skills in all of the same question formats you’ll see on GMAT test day: Data Sufficiency, Problem Solving, Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. If you’d rather not take separate tests, take an all-in-one online GMAT practice test.

What to Expect

These short, free GMAT diagnostic tests are best taken by students who already have at least beginner-level knowledge of the test. The quizzes assume that you are familiar with the basic question formats on the GMAT. For GMAT Quantitative, the Problem Solving questions are the same five-option multiple-choice questions, similar to what you have seen on virtually every standardized test in your life. However, the Data Sufficiency questions are unique to the GMAT.

Similarly, on Verbal, Reading Comprehension questions are comparable to ones you’ve seen on many other standardized tests, but the Sentence Correction and Critical Reasoning questions might be a little different from what you have seen before.

If you are brand new to the GMAT, it’s probably a good idea to get familiar with the mechanics of the various question formats before you take these mock GMAT tests online. You can learn about the GMAT “big picture” (question formats, topics, pacing, etc…) in Magoosh’s Hassle-Free Guide to the GMAT Test—or in the GMAT Official Guide from the test-makers, GMAC.

For both GMAT exam diagnostics, answer explanations are provided at the end. Pay close attention to these answer explanations, as they often contain tips and strategies that can be used to answer other similar questions.

Exam Summary and Scores

Once you have taken each of the free online GMAT diagnostic tests, you will get an email with your score. Then you can look at your recommendations, based on your scores. The GMAT prep recommendations appear in the section immediately below.

By the way, don’t be discouraged if you found the mock GMAT tests hard: the GMAT test is supposed to be hard! Keep in mind that these are just diagnostic tests to measure where you are in your GMAT journey. No matter where you start, Magoosh can help you with your GMAT prep! You can choose between a live cohorted class with an instructor (which includes all our lessons and practice questions) or access to the self-study option by itself.

As you follow your recommended study plans, take notice of the types of questions that you get wrong. For example, are you stronger or weaker in Sentence Correction? And what is your accuracy like in Data Sufficiency versus Problem Solving? Pinpointing your strengths and weaknesses can help you craft the perfect approach to your studies!

How to Use Each Diagnostic Test to Shape Your Study Plan

As you can see in the recommendations in your test results, we have divided the possible GMAT diagnostic test results into four “score groups” that include a recommended study plan and other tips and tricks.

Just as importantly, you should see this GMAT diagnostic tool as just a start to your studies, and not an absolute measure of your ability. In other words, just because you may do poorly in a given area (Data Sufficiency, Sentence Correction, Problem Solving, etc.) right now does not mean you’ll continue to do poorly.

So if you get a less than ideal score on a given GMAT diagnostic test, don’t panic! Instead, be aware that these two short mini-tests give a merely a tentative snapshot of where your skills might be for now. Real, in-depth practice is needed to fully measure your GMAT exam abilities. And of course, extending your GMAT exam practice well beyond each diagnostic also allows you to build and improve on all of your GMAT skills. And once you’ve started prepping, check out our GMAT Question of the Day for a new Verbal or Quant practice question for each day of the month!

Ready to get an awesome GMAT score? Start here.

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Author

  • Mike MᶜGarry

    Mike served as a GMAT Expert at Magoosh, helping create hundreds of lesson videos and practice questions to help guide GMAT students to success. He was also featured as "member of the month" for over two years at GMAT Club. Mike holds an A.B. in Physics (graduating magna cum laude) and an M.T.S. in Religions of the World, both from Harvard. Beyond standardized testing, Mike has over 20 years of both private and public high school teaching experience specializing in math and physics. In his free time, Mike likes smashing foosballs into orbit, and despite having no obvious cranial deficiency, he insists on rooting for the NY Mets. Learn more about the GMAT through Mike's Youtube video explanations and resources like What is a Good GMAT Score? and the GMAT Diagnostic Test.