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Magoosh IELTS Podcast: English Vocabulary You Need to Know

Listen to the Magoosh IELTS podcast and learn the English vocabulary words you need to know to get a higher IELTS band score.
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Vocabulary Lesson 1: Information
English Dialogue Lesson 1 (Ep. 6): Information
Vocabulary Lesson 2: Environment
English Dialogue Lesson 2 (Ep. 7): Environment
Vocabulary Lesson 3: Weather
English Dialogue Lesson 3 (Ep. 8): Weather
Vocabulary Lesson 4: Technology
*New* English Dialogue Lesson 4 (Ep. 9): Technology
Vocabulary Lesson 5: Travel

Magoosh IELTS Podcast

Vocabulary Lesson 1: Information

Listen and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher. Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Magoosh IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to giving and receiving information: Interpret, Assume, Perceive, and React.

You’ll see this vocabulary in the reading passages on your IELTS exam. These words will also be useful as you’re writing responses to your task one and task two questions.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

IELTS Podcast – Episode 1 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 1. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to information: Interpret, Assume, Perceive, and React

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Magoosh IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: he does not like watermelon!

Eliot Intro

Hello Magoosh IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Magoosh, and it’s true, I’m not a picky eater, but I just don’t like watermelon. Today, we’re going to look at four words that are going to help you to understand the kind of language you’re going to see in the reading passages on your IELTS exam.

These words will also be useful as you’re writing responses to your task one and task two questions.

Make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

The theme for the words in today’s episode is information, and what we do with information when we think about things or when we interpret things.

Interpret

And in fact, interpret is the first word on the list. So let’s start with that one, okay?

Interpret, what does it mean?

Well, to interpret something means to make sense of something. To analyze something.

We could use it, for example, in a situation where you are trying to analyze something you’re reading or hearing in another language, a language that’s not your native language.

When you hear a word, and you are able to say it in your own language, maybe you’ll then try to explain it to a friend who doesn’t understand, you are interpreting what you hear.

But it doesn’t have to be another language, you could interpret something that’s already in your own language.

Often we use the word interpret for understanding something that’s complicated or difficult to understand, right?

So maybe you have a complicated contract you’re looking at, and maybe it’s so complicated, you need a lawyer, or somebody, to help you understand what’s there.

The lawyer is going to interpret it for you, to make sense of it, or analyze it for you.

That’s what interpret means.

Assume

The next word is assume.

To assume is to make a conclusion about something without having all of the facts or information.

We often use the word assume when we’ve discovered that we are actually thinking about the wrong thing, or we’ve made a mistake about something.

So for an example, maybe you thought a friend wasn’t coming to a party you were throwing.

But then, actually, she did arrive.

Okay so, you could say in that situation to your friend, “hey, I assumed you weren’t coming to my party, but I was so happy that you actually came.”

To assume something is to think a certain way about something, without having all the facts or information.

It does not necessarily mean you were wrong.

You can assume something and find out that you’re correct about it later. For example, maybe you assume your friend isn’t going to the party, and in fact she doesn’t go. This time her actions supported your assumption. (Assumption is the noun form of the verb “to assume” by the way. To assume is the verb.)

But, it’s to think something without having all of the facts or the information. Okay? So that’s assume.

Perceive

The next word on our list for today is to perceive.

To perceive something simply means to sense or to feel something without clear evidence.

We often use perceive when we’re taking in information that is not clear or not certain.

So for example, maybe a teacher can perceive that her students are tired or bored, right?

The students aren’t telling the teacher, hey teacher, I’m bored.

Instead the teacher is picking up clues from the student’s body language, or maybe the students are yawning—and in this way the teacher perceives that they are bored or tired.

When you perceive something, you’re taking in indirect information and trying to understand it.

So that’s perceive.

React

The final word today is to react.

To react is different than the words we’ve discussed so far because when you react to something, it’s a response.

When you react to something, it means that you respond in a particular way directly to that thing you just observed or noticed.

So for example, when we use the word react in athletics or sports, when somebody throws you the ball, you’re not going to just let it hit you, you’re going to react to it. You’re going to try to catch it.

So that’s react.

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to information. For more vocabulary, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in iTunes and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh wishing you happy studying.

English Dialogue Lesson 1 (Ep. 6): Information

Listen and subscribe on Stitcher or iTunes. Or listen right here:

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

English Dialogue Lesson 1 – Episode 6 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Podcast! This is Lesson 6. In this episode, you’re going to hear dialogue containing the vocabulary words that your teacher Eliot defined in Vocabulary Lesson 1. These are 4 words all related to Information: Interpret, Assume, Perceive, and React.

If you haven’t listened to episode 1 yet, you might want to listen to that first, so that you know the definitions of these words. I’ll put a link in the show notes.
Also, check out the show notes to get your free download: the IELTS vocabulary list, which contains these words and others that you’ll find on the test. Plus visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score. Use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep!

Okay let’s get started! Listen to this dialogue between Jerome and Maria as they talk about Maria’s recent date. See if you can pick out the 4 IELTS vocabulary words as you listen.

Dialogue Part 1

Jerome: Hey Maria, how was your date? Seriously, tell me everything!

Maria: Oh wow, Jerome, it was so good! It was really good.

Jerome: That’s great, I’m so happy for you! I want the whole story!

Maria: Well, we just went out to a bar and had a few drinks, and then got dinner at that Kebab place downtown that you and I went to the other night. And then he had to go home. But he was really great – a lot better than I’d thought he would be.

Jerome: I’m so glad that it went well. Are you going to go out with him again? And, uh, remind me of his name?

Maria: His name is Tom. But…yeah, I don’t think we’re going to go out again.

Jerome: What? Why not? You just said it was really good!

Maria: Well, I did have a great time, but I’m always going out with these guys who aren’t looking for anything serious. Maybe that’s my type? Anyways, I always assume I can change them – but really I can’t change them. I shouldn’t even be trying to change them in the first place. And I need to stop chasing people who don’t want what I want. I need to stop ignoring all the red flags.

Jerome: So you think he’s not looking for anything serious?

Maria: Yeah.

Jerome: What did he do to make you react that way?

Maria: He was just really charming. I’m sure it’s easy for him to get dates. So why would he want to settle down with just one person? And it also seems like he works a lot…he probably doesn’t have time for a proper relationship.

Jerome: Did he say that he wasn’t looking for anything serious?

Maria: Not really. He just seems like that type of guy.

Jerome: Huh. Well, I definitely agree that you shouldn’t try to force a relationship with someone who doesn’t want to be in one. But it also doesn’t sound like you have a lot of information about how he feels. You shouldn’t assume that he’s not looking for anything serious either. That is, unless he’s actually told you so, of course.

Maria: Maybe. Still, I got the feeling that he was trying to keep things casual.

Jerome: But how did you perceive that, besides the fact that he was charming?

Maria: Well, he told me that he couldn’t stay out too late, because he had to get up early for work in the morning.

Jerome: That seems like a normal way to react to a Sunday night date. It’s pretty reasonable to want to get enough sleep if you have work in the morning. What’s making you interpret the fact that he wanted to go to bed early to mean that he’s trying to keep things casual?

Maria: I just think that if he was having a good time, he wouldn’t have minded missing a little sleep.

Jerome: I don’t know. Some people are really serious about their work. I don’t think that means that he doesn’t want to spend time with you. Have you heard from him since yesterday?

Midroll

Before we find out whether Maria has heard from her date, let’s pause for a word from Magoosh.

Do you want a great IELTS score?
Magoosh can help!

Here’s what you’ll get with Magoosh:
In-depth video lessons that cover concepts, pitfalls, and shortcuts
Over 200 practice questions to help you prepare for your exam
24/7 email access to a team of remote tutors ready to answer your questions
Are you ready to improve your score and get into your dream program? Great! We’re ready to help you. Visit us at ielts.magoosh.com and use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep.
Now back to the story!

Dialogue Part 2

Maria: No, nothing yet.

Jerome: Yeah, okay. Well I think it’s good that you’re not getting your hopes up. Obviously you perceived something in the way he was acting that made you feel like he’s not super interested in you. But from what you’ve told me about your date so far…I wouldn’t necessarily interpret any of that stuff to mean that he doesn’t want to see you again.

Maria: Maybe you’re right…I did have a lot of fun. And I think he had a good time too. I just don’t know how to react when someone shows an interest in me, because even if they do really like me, that doesn’t mean they will want to make it an ongoing thing.

Jerome: Well, you did just meet each other. I wouldn’t worry about all of that too much yet. All I’m saying is: don’t assume that he doesn’t want to see you again. Give it a little time! Or at least wait until you have a bit more information.

Maria: Ahh!

Jerome: What??

Maria: He just texted me!

Jerome: What did he say??

Maria: He said, “I was soooo tired at work today” and then a smiley face.

Jerome: Wow, I can’t believe he just texted you. Speak of the devil.

Maria: [chuckles] yeah. So what does it mean?

Jerome: Hmm, I’m not sure how exactly to interpret that text. Like, it’s bad that he was tired, but obviously a smiley face is good. So maybe that means that he didn’t mind being tired, because he had a good time last night? I don’t know…whatever he’s trying to say, it’s definitely good that he texted you! Are you going to respond?

Maria: Yeah, I might wait a little while though. I’m not sure what the best thing to say is. How would you react to a text like this?

Jerome: I’ll have to think about it. But yeah, wait a while…if you answer immediately he might perceive you to be someone who’s just waiting by their phone all day.

Maria: Yeah, you’re right. Hey, I’m getting kind of hungry. Do you want to help me make some lunch, and then afterwards we can figure out what I should do?

Jerome: Yeah, that sounds like a good plan! It’s hard to think on an empty stomach.

Maria: I have stuff to make ham sandwiches, does that sound good to you?

Jerome: Yeah definitely, let’s do it. It won’t hurt Tom to wait a little while.

Maria: [chuckles] Keeping him guessing! That would make two of us.

Outro

So how did you do? Did you hear and understand all of the vocabulary words? If you need more practice, check out the show notes for a transcript of this episode so that you can follow along and listen again.

Oh and by the way! We’re looking for volunteers to help us translate the show transcripts from English to your first language. If you are interested, please email me at naomi@magoosh.com with the subject line “translation,” and let me know what language you can translate into!

Thanks for listening! If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in Apple Podcasts, it helps people find us! And don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh, wishing you happy studying!

Vocabulary Lesson 2: Environment

Listen and subscribe on Stitcher or iTunes. Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Magoosh IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to the environment: Pollution, Erosion, Emissions, and Sustainable.

You’ll likely see this vocabulary in the reading passages on your IELTS exam.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

IELTS Podcast – Episode 2 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 2. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to the environment: Pollution, Erosion, Emissions, and Sustainable.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Magoosh IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: he’s is a scuba diver who is passionate about ocean conservation!

Eliot Intro

Hello Magoosh IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Magoosh. Today, we’re going to look at four words that you are likely to see in the reading passages on your IELTS exam.

Now, I did tell you that you don’t need to memorize all of the specialized words that you’ll see in IELTS Reading. However, it is still helpful to look at a few common words from the most common topics in IELTS Reading passages.

I’m talking about the environment and life sciences. The IELTS loves these two closely related topics.  Below are some environment and life science words that you are likely to see somewhere in the Reading section.

Make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

The theme for the words in today’s episode is the environment, and the relationship between the environment and humankind.

Pollution

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is pollution. So let’s start with that one, okay?

Pollution, what does it mean?

Well, “pollution” describes things from the human world that enter the environment and harm it. Pollution is contamination that makes the environment impure.

So one example of pollution is the garbage that we dump into the rivers and oceans.

This garbage can release toxic chemicals into the water, killing plants and animals, and destroying ecosystems.

Another example of pollution is the smoke that our cars and factories release into the air.

In many big cities around the world, the smoke from factories and cars has caused so much air pollution that the air isn’t safe to breath anymore. In these cities, you will see people wearing breathing masks to protect themselves from the pollution in the air.

When humans put harmful things into the environment, it damages the environment.

That’s pollution.

Erosion

The next word is erosion.

So “erosion” is when dirt or sand gets removed from the surface of the earth by wind or water. When dirt washes or blows away, plants die off, and ecosystems change. Erosion is what we call this process of soil being worn away, causing changes in the environment.

One example of natural erosion is the Grand Canyon in Arizona. This giant gorge was formed by the Colorado River wearing down the rock over many centuries. The erosion caused by the river is what created the beautiful canyon we see today.

Not all erosion is natural. Human activities can also often lead to erosion. When humans cut down trees, the soil beneath the trees is exposed. Without the trees to stop the wind, or the roots to hold the soil together, erosion will take place much more quickly. This is one way in which humans are responsible for erosion.

When the soil is worn away nothing can grow there anymore.

So that’s erosion.

Emissions

The next word is emissions.

“Emissions” refers to any kind of gas, smoke, or air that is released into the environment. We often use the word “emissions” to describe the pollution that humans are putting into the air.

So for example, when a factory produces smoke, we call this smoke the factory’s emissions.

Many human activities produce emissions that pollute the environment, and scientists have advised that we reduce our emissions in order to protect the planet.

One of the reasons that electric cars are becoming more popular is that they produce fewer emissions than traditional gas-burning cars.

So that’s emissions.

Sustainable

The final word for today is sustainable.

To be sustainable is to not cause damage to the environment or use up all of a resource. If an activity is sustainable it means that the activity can be continued indefinitely without environmental consequences.

Solar power is an example of a sustainable energy source. We will never run out of sunlight, and setting up solar panels doesn’t create much pollution. The fact that we can keep using solar energy without destroying the environment or completely using up the sun’s energy is what makes solar energy sustainable.

Oil is an example of an energy source that is not sustainable. Eventually we will use up all the oil stored in the earth. Drilling for oil also hurts the environment, which could one day lead to the earth becoming too damaged to continue supporting life. Oil is not sustainable.

If something’s sustainable it means we can keep doing it.

So that’s sustainable.

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to the environment—for more vocabulary, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in iTunes and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh wishing you happy studying.

English Dialogue Lesson 2 (Ep. 7): Environment

Listen and subscribe on Stitcher or iTunes. Or listen right here:

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

English Dialogue Lesson 2 – Episode 7 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Podcast! This is Lesson 7. In this episode, you’re going to hear dialogue containing the vocabulary words that your teacher Eliot defined in Vocabulary Lesson 2. These are 4 words all related to the environment: Pollution, Erosion, Emissions, and Sustainable.
If you haven’t listened to lesson 2 yet, you might want to listen to that first, so that you know the definitions of these words. I’ll put a link in the show notes.

Also, check out the show notes to get your free download: the IELTS vocabulary list, which contains these words and others that you’ll find on the test. Plus visit us at IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score. Use coupon code “ieltspodcast” (that’s one word) to save 20% off your IELTS test prep!

Okay let’s get started! Listen to this dialogue between Andre and Yuriko as they talk about their new jobs. See if you can pick out the 4 IELTS vocabulary words as you listen.

Dialogue Part 1

Andre: Wow, it’s so good to see you Yuriko. How long has it been? Eight months?

Yuriko: Yeah eight months…I’ve been traveling a lot for work. But I’m so glad we could get lunch while I’m in town! I’m flying out again on Friday. It’s so hard to fit everything into my schedule these days.

Andre: Sounds like it. So tell me about this new job. Last time I saw you, I think you were still a raft guide in Colorado…?

Yuriko: Well, I graduated at the end of last May, and that’s when I started the guiding job. But that was just for the summer.

Andre: Remind me what your degree was in again?

Yuriko: I did a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science and Sustainable Agriculture.

Andre: Oh yeah, I remember now. Okay, so you were a raft guide for the summer…was that in the Grand Canyon?

Yuriko: Yes, we were in the Grand Canyon. It was such an amazing opportunity. As you know, I’ve spent a lot of time in the backcountry, but there’s no place on earth quite like the Grand Canyon. I really got to know the land. But the National Parks Service is facing a lot of challenges…it was so sad to see how fast the erosion of the canyons is progressing. The way we’re treating the land really isn’t sustainable.

Andre: So why did you leave that job?

Yuriko: Oh, that kind of guiding is just seasonal work, and I needed to be making money year-round. I would love to go back again, but I’m pretty locked in to my current job for now.

Andre: Yeah, so tell me about this new job!

Yuriko: Well my official job title is Environmental Sustainability Consultant. I work as a part of a larger consulting firm of about thirty-five people. We’re contracted out to help companies create plans and programs that will reduce their negative impact on the environment…things like bringing down their emissions, properly disposing of their waste, cutting down on pollution…that sort of stuff.

Andre: And that has you traveling a lot? How do you like that lifestyle?

Yuriko: Yeah, I’ll go to the headquarters, or different worksites, and get a feel for what sort of policies the company already has in place. From there we can develop a plan for the areas where they may be able to improve. It’s really important to get facetime with the people on the ground, and I love seeing new places…but it can be exhausting to be on the road all the time.

Andre: But you like the work, overall?

Yuriko: It was a difficult transition for me at first, of course. Going from being out on the river every day to a lot of paperwork and corporate stuff and waiting in airports. As a raft guide, you get to be out in nature, but you’re also seeing the negative effects humans are having on the environment…the dams, and the pollution, the trash in the river…and you can’t do anything about it. At least at this job I feel like I’m really making a difference.

Andre: Yeah, that makes a lot of sense.

Yuriko: It does bother me that I’m flying so much though—from an environmental perspective. Did you know that one round-trip flight from New York City to Los Angeles produces the same amount of greenhouse gas emissions as ten weeks of driving a car? The carbon footprint of air travel is huge.

Andre: Oh wow, I knew planes used a lot of fuel, but I didn’t realize it was that much.

Yuriko: Yeah. Hopefully as technology advances we’ll be able to create more sustainable ways of traveling….but what about you, what are you up to these days? Still leading backpacking trips?

Midroll

Before we hear from Andre, let’s pause for a word from Magoosh.

Do you want a great IELTS score?
Magoosh can help!

Here’s what you’ll get with Magoosh:
In-depth video lessons that cover concepts, pitfalls, and shortcuts
Over 200 practice questions to help you prepare for your exam
24/7 email access to a team of remote tutors ready to answer your questions
Are you ready to improve your score and get into your dream program? Great! We’re ready to help you. Visit us at ielts.magoosh.com and use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep.
Now back to the story!

Dialogue Part 2

Andre: Yeah, I’m working full-time for the Outdoor Leadership School now. It’s definitely a for-profit organization, but I like the work.

Yuriko: What kind of trips have you been leading?

Andre: I specialize in the Southwest. So we’re doing one to three month trips out in the desert and canyonlands, which is a whole lot of hiking, as well as courses on outdoor survival skills and ecology. We teach students some of the same things you were talking about: the erosion of the land from farming and development, and how the desert ecosystems have been impacted by people.

Yuriko: I actually did my college thesis on the erosion caused by industrial farming practices in the parts of Arizona that get their water from the dams.

Andre: Oh wow, I didn’t know that…you should definitely pass that along to me, I’d love to share some of that information with my students.

Yuriko: I’d be happy to. Helping businesses lower their emissions is obviously important, but it’s so vital to connect with the younger generation and teach them about the land. How does that quote about love and conservation go?

Andre: It’s “People protect what they love, they love what they understand, and they understand what they’re taught.” Jacques Cousteau. Good quote for a teacher to know [chuckles].

Yuriko: [Laughs] Yeah, you were ready for that one.

Andre: So how’s your family doing?

Yuriko: They’re good. My younger sister is about to start university, so I think my parents are getting a little emotional. Empty nest and all that. I know they miss me, but they respect my work.

Andre: Yeah, I mean it’s hard to criticize your daughter when she’s fighting corporate pollution.

Yuriko: I do what I can. How about you, are you still with Amelia?

Andre: Yeah, we’re good…we’re good. We just got a place together on the west side. It’s a big step for me.

Yuriko: Wow, that’s amazing! I’m so happy for you!

Andre: Yeah, the idea of moving in with someone has always been a bit scary to me…but when you think about it, we’re both out leading trips for at least six months out of the year. And those six months don’t necessarily overlap.

Yuriko: So Amelia works for the Outdoor Leadership School as well?

Andre: Yeah, we met as co-trip leaders actually.

Yuriko: That’s very sweet.

[phone rings]

Andre: Oh, sorry, I’ve got to take this. But I’ll be right back, don’t go anywhere!

Yuriko: No worries, take your time! I’ll get another coffee.

Outro

So how did you do? Did you hear and understand all of the vocabulary words? If you need more practice, check out the show notes for a transcript of this episode so that you can follow along and listen again.
Oh and by the way! We’re looking for volunteers to help us translate the show transcripts from English to your first language. If you are interested, please email me at naomi@magoosh.com with the subject line “translation,” and let me know what language you can translate into!
Thanks for listening! If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in Apple Podcasts, it helps people find us! And don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh, wishing you happy studying!

Vocabulary Lesson 3: Weather

Listen and subscribe on Stitcher or iTunes. Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Magoosh IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to weather: Chilly, Muggy, Balmy, and Sleet.

It’s common for questions about weather and climate to come up during the Speaking section, so we’re going to go over a few good vocab words that you can use to talk about different kinds of weather.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

IELTS Podcast – Episode 3 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 3. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to weather: Chilly, Muggy, Balmy, and Sleet.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Magoosh IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: Eliot grew up in a part of the U.S. known for tornadoes and had to hide in the basement on more than one occasion.

Eliot Intro

Hello Magoosh IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Magoosh. Today, we’re going to look at four words that will be useful for the Speaking section of the IELTS. It’s common for questions about weather and climate to come up during the Speaking section, so we’re going to go over a few good vocab words that you can use to talk about different kinds of weather.

As always, make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

The theme for the words in today’s episode is weather, and ways to describe different types of weather.

Chilly

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is chilly. So let’s start with that one, okay?

Chilly…what does chilly mean?

Well, when describing weather, “chilly” means cold in a way that is uncomfortable. Chilly is similar to the word “cold”. However, we mostly use “chilly” to describe weather, or how weather makes us feel, whereas the word “cold” can be used to describe anything that’s low in temperature.

For example, on the first cold day of autumn, people would probably describe the weather as chilly. They may also describe themselves as chilly, if they happen to get caught outside without a jacket!

On the other hand, the word “cold” can be used to describe a much wider variety of things than the word chilly. When you put your leftover pizza in the refrigerator, the pizza will become cold. But we wouldn’t describe the pizza as chilly. We just use chilly to talk about weather that’s cold enough to make us uncomfortable.

So, that’s chilly.

Muggy

The next word is muggy.

Okay, “muggy” means very hot and humid. Like chilly, muggy is really only used to describe weather. This makes sense when you think about it, because air is the only thing that can be humid. Humid air is air that has a lot of water vapor in it.  So for weather to be muggy, it would have to not only be hot, but also humid.

Some climates – like the tropics – have a lot of muggy weather, while other climates – like the mountains – will almost never have weather that’s muggy. And don’t forget, humidity is a key part of what makes weather muggy. So weather in a desert climate probably wouldn’t be muggy, because even though deserts get very hot, there typically won’t be much water vapor in the air.

Like chilly weather, muggy weather can make us uncomfortable. Most people dislike muggy weather, because when the air is muggy it can be difficult to stay cool, and you get very sticky.

So that’s muggy.

Balmy

The next word is balmy.

Finally some good weather! Balmy means a comfortable outdoor temperature, not too hot and not too cold, usually with some gentle wind. We could also describe balmy weather as mild, or temperate.

Although balmy weather isn’t too hot, it’s still warm. Just think of what it’s like on a really nice day summer day, when it’s not too hot, but you don’t have to wear a jacket.

It’s no surprise that balmy weather is something that most people enjoy. For example, a lot of people choose to vacation in places where the weather is balmy, so they can enjoy spending time outside. Balmy weather is pleasant and warm, but not too hot.

So that’s balmy.

Sleet

The final word today is sleet.

So far, all of our words in this episode have been adjectives. Adjectives are words that describe something. In this case, we have been describing weather, by talking about the weather’s temperature and how it makes us feel. Sleet is different, because sleet is a noun, meaning it’s a thing rather than a description.

Sleet is a mix of snow and rain, falling together from the sky. Sleet is similar to frozen rain (which we call hail). However, sleet is not completely frozen, so it’s not solid like hail. Just imagine snow mixed with water. It’s very wet, icy snow, raining down.

You wouldn’t want to get caught outside without an umbrella and a warm coat when there’s sleet coming down. Many people also try to avoid driving their cars when sleet has been falling, because sleet can make roads icy.

So that’s sleet

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to weather – for more words, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

##

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in iTunes and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh wishing you happy studying.

English Dialogue Lesson 3 (Ep. 8): Weather

Listen and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher. Or listen right here:

English Dialogue Lesson 3 – Episode 8 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Podcast! This is Lesson 8. In this episode, you’re going to hear dialogue containing the vocabulary words that your teacher Eliot defined in Vocabulary Lesson 3. These are 4 words all related to weather: Chilly, Muggy, Balmy, and Sleet.

If you haven’t listened to episode 3 yet, you might want to listen to that first, so that you know the definitions of these words. I’ll put a link in the show notes.

Also, check out the show notes to get your free download: the IELTS vocabulary list, which contains these words and others that you’ll find on the test. Plus visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score. Use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep!

Okay let’s get started! Listen to this dialogue between Maya and Gabrielle as they talk about learning to surf. See if you can pick out the 4 IELTS vocabulary words as you listen.

Dialogue Part 1

Maya: You know what I’ve been thinking about a lot the past few weeks?

Gabrielle: What?

Maya: I think it’s time for us to properly learn how to surf.

Gabrielle: Yeah, for sure! I would love to actually be able to surf. I really enjoyed that surf lesson we had in San Diego. I’ve wanted to surf since I was in high school, but since I’ve never had my own car, it’s always seemed impossible to get a surfboard to and from the beach.

Maya: Well my new place is so close to the water…we could probably just walk with our boards.

Gabrielle: That’s true…that’s true. So is that what made you decide that now is the time to finally learn to surf for real?

Maya: Well, yeah, first of all, we’re so close to the beach…it’s not like in Oregon. Back then we’d have to plan a whole weekend trip just to get to the coast.

Gabrielle: Yeah, who has the time for that?! Especially when the beaches are always so chilly! Like it’s not fun to hang out on the beach when it’s cold, and I don’t want to have to wear a full wetsuit just to get in the water.

Maya: Right. Do you remember the last time we went out to the Oregon coast? It was literally pouring down rain and sleet…the road was so icy I thought we’d never even make it to the beach.

Gabrielle: Yeah, that definitely made surfing seem way less appealing to me.

Maya: Right?! Anyway, yeah, so now that we’ve been blessed with a house close to the beach and such beautiful, balmy weather, I think we should learn how to surf for real.

Gabrielle: That makes sense. It’s just intimidating to start something new I guess…I hate being a beginner. Once I tried to learn how to ice skate, but I got really frustrated because there were all these little kids there who were extremely good, and I could barely stand up. It’s just sort of embarrassing to be surrounded by people who are much better than you at the activity you’re doing.

Maya: Yeah I feel the same, but I think we really need to learn how to be okay with not being perfect at everything. That’s the only way to learn new skills! You have to start somewhere.

Gabrielle: Yeah. You’re right. So where do we start?

Maya: Well this weekend definitely isn’t the time. Have you noticed how weird the weather has been?

Gabrielle: Yeah, it’s kind of strangely humid and overcast all of a sudden. Isn’t there a word for that?

Maya: Yeah, it’s muggy. So the reason it went from being super hot and sunny to actually kind of chilly, and then overcast but hot and humid over the course of two days is because there’s a tropical cyclone coming in from the north this week.

Gabrielle: Oh, I just remembered that Colin texted me last night to say that he couldn’t sleep because it was so muggy up north where he’s working this week. I haven’t heard that word used a lot before. But I guess it’s typical cyclone weather! Anyways, he also said that he’s annoyed he has to be at work when the surf is so good down south right now.

Maya: Yeah, exactly — so what’s happening is that this cyclone is coming in from the ocean and heading down the coast this weekend, and that creates these specials winds, which I guess make the surf really huge. Everyone’s heading down south to surf right now. And apparently these weather conditions only happen once every ten years or something.

Gabrielle: Okay, I see. So there are some super special waves coming in right now, but they’re probably too big for beginners like us.

Maya: Yeah.

Gabrielle: To be honest I don’t think I would be able to get all the surfing gear together by this weekend anyways, so the cyclone doesn’t really make a difference.

Maya: True.

Gabrielle: But it is nice to have some overcast days for once. Not that I don’t love the sunshine and the balmy beach weather, but it becomes kind of old after a few months. Plus I feel like I’ve been getting sunburned every time I go outside.

Maya: For sure. Well maybe we can try and find some surfboards next week? I’ll be done with summer school after Thursday.

Midroll

Before we find out the rest of Maya and Gabrielle’s surfing plans, let’s pause for a word from Magoosh.

Do you want a great IELTS score?
Magoosh can help!

Here’s what you’ll get with Magoosh:
In-depth video lessons that cover concepts, pitfalls, and shortcuts
Over 200 practice questions to help you prepare for your exam
24/7 email access to a team of smart and fun remote tutors ready to answer your questions
Are you ready to improve your score and get into your dream program? Great! We’re ready to help you. Visit us at ielts.magoosh.com and use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep.
Now back to the story!

Dialogue Part 2

Gabrielle: Okay, that sounds good. I think my aunt might have some extra ones at her house actually.

Maya: Oh that would be fantastic. I have no idea how much a surfboard costs, but I assume they’re not cheap.

Gabrielle: Yeah, I definitely saw at least one board the last time I was over at her place. And even if she only has one, we could probably borrow that one and then just split the cost of the second board.

Maya: Great, that works for me! Okay so, do you think that we will need wetsuits? The water here is pretty warm, but I assume it gets chilly when you’re out in the water for a few hours at a time.

Gabrielle: I don’t think I’ve seen anyone in wetsuits. You probably stay warm from the physical activity…remember how it was in San Diego? The water wasn’t all that warm, but you’re moving constantly so it’s not a problem.

Maya: You’re right…I probably will have to buy a one-piece swimsuit though. My bikini is fine for swimming, but it’s probably not the best for getting knocked around in the waves.

Gabrielle: Yeah, okay, let’s go look for swimsuits this weekend. Wow my hair is so frizzy today, this humidity is really too much for me.

Maya: I kind of like that it’s muggy, it reminds me of when I was in Bali. But also I don’t have to deal with the frizz because my hair is in braids, so I guess it’s not as much of a problem for me.

Gabrielle: What would you say is your favorite kind of weather?

Maya: Hmm, I think it really depends. I just like variety. Obviously a mild balmy climate is the best, but like I said before, even that gets old after a while. And actually, I don’t mind “bad” weather. It feels so nice and cozy to stay inside when there’s really nasty rain or sleet.

Gabrielle: Ugh but sleet is the worst! You don’t drive, so you don’t know what it’s like to have to deal with the roads being icy. It’s terrible.

Maya: Yeah, I guess you’re right. But you don’t even have a car right now! Anyways I don’t think the weather will even get that bad here in the winter, we’re too far south.

Gabrielle: Yeah, that’s why I moved here!

Maya: That was a very good call. Okay so this weekend we’ll get swimsuits, and you ask your aunt about the surfboards.

Gabrielle: Sounds perfect. So do you think we should…I don’t know…take lessons?

Maya: Yeah, I think if I just tried to go out into the water without any instruction I wouldn’t actually be able to surf at all. I just don’t remember how to do it. And plus if we learn with bad form it’ll make things more difficult later.

Gabrielle: Okay, yeah, you’re right. How much do you think lessons cost?

Maya: No idea. How about I’ll look into that, and you try to get us the boards.

Gabrielle: Sweet, sounds like a plan. I’m so excited that we’re finally going to learn how to surf. I think this could be really great!

Maya: Yeah, I’ve always wanted to surf, I just never made the commitment before. But I think we’re finally ready. Plus we can support each other through the difficult beginning part. It’s always nice to have a friend to learn new skills with. I’m so glad you want to do this with me!

Gabrielle: Absolutely, I couldn’t agree more.

##
So how did you do? Did you hear and understand all of the vocabulary words? If you need more practice, check out the show notes for a transcript of this episode so that you can follow along and listen again.
Oh and by the way! We’re looking for volunteers to help us translate the show transcripts from English to your first language. If you are interested, please email me at naomi@magoosh.com with the subject line “translation,” and let me know what language you can translate into!
Thanks for listening! If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in Apple Podcasts, it helps people find us! And don’t forget to hit the subscribe button so you don’t miss the next lesson. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh, wishing you happy studying!

Vocabulary Lesson 4: Technology

Listen and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher. Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Magoosh IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to technology: Device, Mobile, Innovation, and Revolutionize

The topic of technology is a popular source of questions on the IELTS Speaking test.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

IELTS Podcast: Episode 4 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 4. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to technology: Device, Mobile, Innovation, and Revolutionize.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Magoosh IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: The first piece of technology Eliot ever owned was a cassette tape player.

Eliot Intro

Hello Magoosh IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Magoosh. Today, we’re going to look at four words that will be useful for the Speaking section of the IELTS. The topic of technology is a popular source of questions on the IELTS Speaking test, so we’re going to go over a few good vocabulary words that you can use to talk about the field of technology as a whole, as well as some specific pieces of technology.

As always, make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

Once again, the theme for the words in today’s episode is technology, and ways to describe different types of technology and technological advances.

Device

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is device. So let’s start with that one, okay?

What does the word “device” mean?

Well, a device is any technological machine. I know this sounds pretty general, so let’s get a more specific look.

When we use the word “device”, we are typically speaking about an electronic item that allows people to get on the Internet, make phone calls, or possibly send messages. So usually when we say “device” we are talking about someone’s phone, or computer, or tablet. However, there are more kinds of devices than just the ones you use to connect to the Internet or call your mom.

Technically, any mechanical or electronic tool is a device. For example, while your laptop is a device, something as simple as a measuring stick is also a device. A device is any piece of technological equipment.

Don’t worry too much about being able to identify every single device. Just remember that most of the time when someone uses the word device, they’re talking about a phone or a computer. For example, you may have seen advertisements for services that allow you to watch television shows on “all of your devices.” Obviously these ads are using the word “device” to refer to things like phones, computers, and televisions – not measuring sticks!

So, that’s device.

Mobile

The next word is mobile.

What does mobile mean?

Well, the word mobile describes technology related to phones, or other wireless devices that connect to the Internet or send calls and text messages to people

So you can see there is some overlap between “mobile” and “device.” To keep things from getting confusing, let’s be really clear about the differences between these two words.

The word “device” is a noun, meaning that a device is a thing — like a cellphone or computer. The word “mobile” is an adjective, meaning it describes something.

In this case, we use the word mobile to describe anything that is a wireless device. So a television is a device. A television that can wirelessly connect to the internet is a mobile device. However, you’ll mostly hear this word, mobile, used to describe cell phones, which we also call mobile phone, or simply “mobiles.”

So that’s mobile.

Innovation

The next word is innovation.

What does innovation mean?

Well, an innovation is a new and valuable idea or an invention. The word innovation is also commonly used to refer to technological changes in general. A good way to remember the meaning of the word “innovation” is to think of an innovation as being something that is new and improved.

So, for example, when laptop computers were invented, they were considered to be a huge innovation — since before laptops came out everyone had been using clunky desktop computers. Laptops were like desktops, but new and improved.

While we can describe things outside of the field of tech using the word innovation, innovation is mostly associated with advances in technology, and that’s probably the context you will hear it used most on the IELTS.

So that’s innovation.

Revolutionize

The final word today is revolutionize.

Revolutionize, what does that mean?

Well, when referring to technology, to revolutionize means to make a big, important change in the way we use technology. To revolutionize something is to alter it dramatically, so that it is much better.

It’s easy to get confused between innovation and revolutionize, because they both involve improving technology. However, innovation is a noun (a thing) and to revolutionize is a verb (or an action). That’s one difference. Innovation does have a verb form though, which is to innovate. So we’re going to have to get more specific about the difference between these two words.

Here’s a good way to think about the difference between innovation and revolutionize: To revolutionize something is to make a widespread lasting change in a field, while an innovation is any type of new improvement, regardless of whether it makes a widespread lasting change or not. These words mean two different things, though we will often see them together.

For example, the iPhone was an innovation, which revolutionized the smartphone industry. The iPhone itself was a new and valuable invention (otherwise known as an innovation!), which changed the way people thought of phones, revolutionizing the entire phone industry.

So that’s revolutionize.

##

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to technology–-for more vocabulary, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in iTunes and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh wishing you happy studying.

English Dialogue Lesson 4 (Ep. 9): Technology

Listen and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher. Or listen right here:

English Dialogue Lesson 4 – Episode 9 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Podcast! This is Lesson 9. In this episode, you’re going to hear dialogue containing the vocabulary words that your teacher Eliot defined in Vocabulary Lesson 4. These are 4 words all related to technology: Device, Mobile, Innovation, and Revolutionize.

If you haven’t listened to episode 4 yet, you might want to listen to that first, so that you know the definitions of these words. I’ll put a link in the show notes.

Also, check out the show notes to get your free download: the IELTS vocabulary list, which contains these words and others that you’ll find on the test. Plus visit IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score. Use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep!

Okay let’s get started! Listen to this dialogue between Ada and Jackie as Jackie helps Ada buy a new phone. See if you can pick out the 4 IELTS vocabulary words as you listen.

Dialogue Part 1

Ada: Hi there! I’ve just moved here from the United Kingdom…so obviously my UK phone doesn’t work anymore. I’m looking to get a new SIM card so that I can use my mobile phone here in America…or I might even be open to buying a new device altogether, depending on how much it would cost. Is that something you could help me with?

Jackie: Yes, of course! We do offer some plans that are SIM card only, depending on whether the device you’re using is compatible with our company’s SIM cards. Would you prefer a SIM card only plan, or do you think maybe it’s time for a new phone?

Ada: Are the SIM card only plans cheaper?

Jackie: Well yes. Since you aren’t paying for the price of a brand new mobile phone, the SIM card only plans tend to cost less…though we do have a couple of deals going on right now that would allow you to get a pretty great phone for much cheaper than they would normally cost brand new.

Ada: Okay, I’ll think about it. Can you tell me a little about the SIM card only plans that you offer?

Jackie: Sure, but before we get started, why don’t you let me have a look at your phone, and I can tell you if it will be compatible with any of our SIM cards. Unfortunately if it’s not compatible you’ll need to get a new device in order to use our cards.

Ada: Yeah, no problem, here’s my phone.

Jackie: …Oh yeah, this mobile is pretty old. Let me just check in back and see if we have any of the older SIM cards left in stock.

Ada: Okay, thanks.

Jackie: …I’m sorry. I don’t think we have anything that is compatible with your current phone. On the bright side, maybe it’s time for an upgrade! Would you be interested in seeing some of the newer devices that we have available?

Ada: Yeah sure, why not.

Jackie: Great, let’s start with this one…So this is the XC-500, and it’s got all your standard smartphone features, plus a high definition screen. And the developers have made some huge innovations with the voice recognition technology – basically you can set it up to respond specifically to your voice. So that’s pretty cool.

Ada: Yeah, that’s neat.

Jackie: …And then this is the Edge 5 Series, which is also a great device. It comes with a stylus and a physical keyboard, if you prefer a more revolutionized Blackberry-style phone. But see here: there’s still a touch screen and all that good stuff.

Ada: Oh neat, yeah I never quite got the hang of typing on touch screens, I think my fingers are too big or something.

Jackie: Yeah, the touch screens tend to be very sensitive – which obviously is an amazing innovation considering that touch screen technology really only became available in the last ten years…but some people definitely still prefer physical keyboards.

Ada: Okay, great. Are there any other phones that you would recommend?

Jackie: Is there anything in particular that you’re looking for in a mobile device?

Ada: Well if I’m going to be buying a new phone anyways, I would love to get one that has a really good camera – preferably one that can do high definition video. I do a lot of photography and video recordings with my current phone, and I’ve noticed that even though the picture quality is pretty good when there’s enough light, the video always turns out really pixelated and low quality. Do you have any affordable devices that have cameras specifically made for video?

Jackie: Oh, I know just the thing…Okay, so this is the G5-Pro. This phone just came out a few weeks ago, and it’s totally revolutionized the way that we take videos using mobile devices. Basically the main problem facing phone developers has been that there isn’t enough storage space on the devices to store high definition videos. So it’s not even a matter of the quality of the camera lens…there just isn’t enough space on the phone. But with the G5-Pro, they’ve made some major innovations to how we store data. Basically everything is uploaded immediately to the cloud, so space is no longer an issue. Anyways, if you’re looking for a phone with a good video camera, this is the device for you!

Ada: Wow, that sounds like just what I’m looking for!

Jackie: Amazing. And more good news – this phone falls under a promotion we’re doing right now, so if you sign up for a plan with us that includes this device, we’ll give you fifty percent off for the first six months!

Ada: Okay, that sounds really good, I’d definitely be interested in doing that.

Jackie: Do you want me to go over some of the different phone plans with you, and we can figure out which one best suits your needs?

Ada: Yeah, absolutely!

Midroll

Before we find out which phone plan Ada will choose, let’s pause for a word from Magoosh.

Do you want a great IELTS score?
Magoosh can help!

Here’s what you’ll get with Magoosh:
In-depth video lessons that cover concepts, pitfalls, and shortcuts
Over 200 practice questions to help you prepare for your exam
24/7 email access to a team of smart and fun remote tutors ready to answer your questions
So, are you ready to improve your score and get into your dream program? Great! We’re ready to help you. Visit us at ielts.magoosh.com and use coupon code “ieltspodcast” to save 20% off your IELTS test prep. That’s it!
Now back to the story!

Dialogue Part 2

Jackie: Okay, so we have three different types of mobile phone plans for the G5-Pro. All the plans have slightly different features, but the biggest difference is the amount of data you’ll be getting – and obviously the price of the plan. Do you have an idea of how much data you use in a month?

Ada: Hmm, not really. Even though I have a smart phone, I don’t think I’ve had a phone plan that included data before. I would just connect to the WiFi if I wanted to use any of those features.

Jackie: Do you want to stick with a no-data plan? Or would you be interested in trying out a plan with a little bit of data?

Ada: I mean…if it’s affordable then it would be great to have a plan with data. Especially for stuff like the GPS. It’s such a hassle to have to look up the maps ahead of time. And I’m sure I’ll be getting lost a lot since I’m new to this area.

Jackie: Yeah, the GPS is a great feature. And being able to look up maps while on the go will really revolutionize the way you get around. Plus, the good news is that the GPS app actually uses relatively little data. So even if you use the GPS on a daily basis, you probably wouldn’t need a plan with more than one gigabyte of data a month.

Ada: [laughs] Yeah, I have no idea how much a gigabyte is.

Jackie: Don’t worry, most people don’t. So one gigabyte of data would allow you to send or receive about 1,000 emails or browse the Internet for about 20 hours every month.

Ada: Wow, that’s a lot!

Jackie: Yes, and that’s actually the smallest amount of data on a monthly plan that we offer – besides no data of course.

Ada: What’s your plan with the most data?

Jackie: Our plan with the most data offers 16 gigabytes worth of data. So that’s 320 hours of Internet browsing a month. It’s actually an amazing deal, because it only costs $10 more than our next largest data plan, which is only 4 gigabytes a month.

Ada: How can people even use 16 gigabytes in a month…that’s like…what, ten hours a day? No one could possibly be on their phone that much.

Jackie: Well it’s actually easier than you think. Say, for example, you are downloading files, or streaming video…those kinds of activities require a lot more data than just scrolling through Facebook. But you’re right, 16 gigabytes is a lot of data. What we’ve found is that most people who go for this plan actually are using their phones as mobile hotspots for their computers and other devices.

Ada: What does that mean?

Jackie: Well, a mobile hotspot is basically a secure WiFi network. But instead of the WiFi coming from a box that’s installed in your house and connected to cables in the ground, the WiFi is coming directly from your phone, using your data plan.

Ada: Wow, so you’re saying that I could connect my computer to the Internet through my phone anywhere that I had phone service?

Jackie: That’s right! Mobile hotspot technology has totally innovated how we connect to the Internet, especially for people who work on their computers. Whereas before now you would have to go to a library or coffee shop to work, with this data plan you can access the Internet from almost anywhere you want!

Ada: Okay, that actually sounds really amazing. How much does that plan cost per month?

Jackie: It’s $50 per month, but with our promotion it would only cost you $25 a month for the first six months.

Ada: Wow, that’s such a good deal! Sign me up!

Outro

So how did you do? Did you hear and understand all of the vocabulary words? If you need more practice, check out the show notes for a transcript of this episode so that you can follow along and listen again.
Oh and by the way! We’re looking for volunteers to help us translate the show transcripts from English to your first language. If you are interested, please email me at naomi@magoosh.com with the subject line “translation,” and let me know what language you can translate into!
Thanks for listening! If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in Apple Podcasts, it helps people find us! And don’t forget to hit the subscribe button so you don’t miss the next lesson. Until next time! This is Naomi at Magoosh, wishing you happy studying!

Vocabulary Lesson 5: Travel

Listen and subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher. Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Magoosh IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to travel: Accommodation, Transport, Attractions, and High Rise.

Travel and locations are commonly discussed in IELTS Listening conversations, as well as in some IELTS Listening solo speeches.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

Download the complete list of IELTS Vocabulary words.

IELTS Podcast: Episode 5 Transcript

Welcome to the Magoosh IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 5. In this episode, we will cover four words, all related to travel: Accommodation, Transport, Attractions, and High Rise.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit us at IELTS.Magoosh.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Okay! Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Magoosh IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: Although he has spent most of his life in the United States, Eliot has also lived in the Netherlands, Germany, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic.

Eliot Intro

Hello Magoosh IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Magoosh. Today, we’re going to look at four words that will be useful for the Listening section of the IELTS. Travel and locations are commonly discussed in IELTS Listening conversations, as well as in some IELTS Listening solo speeches. So we’re going to go over a few good vocab words that you might hear in the Listening section.

As always, make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

Once again, the theme for the words in today’s episode is travel, and things you might come across as a traveller.

Accommodation

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is accommodation. So let’s start with that one, okay?

What does the word “accommodation” mean? Well, on the IELTS, “accommodation” has two meanings.

First of all, accommodation can mean the place where you live. Maybe you live in a house. Or maybe you live on a boat. Maybe you live on a house-boat. Whatever your housing situation is, the place where you live is called your “accommodation.” It’s very likely that accommodation will be used this way in the IELTS Speaking section, where you may be asked to describe the accommodation you live in.

However, “accommodation” can also refer to the places people stay when they are travelling, places such as hotels, inns, and hostels — rather than their permanent homes. So in the IELTS Listening section, maybe an audio track is about travel, the word “accommodation” is probably being used to talk about the place someone is staying temporarily while traveling.

So, that’s accommodation.

Transport

The next word is transport.

So, what does transport mean?

Well, the word “transport” refers to the way that people move from one place to another, if they aren’t walking. In IELTS conversations, there is often talk about long distance transport, such as trains and airplanes taken to holiday destinations.

The IELTS may also include discussions about transport within a town or neighbourhood. In these cases, transport could be by a car, bicycle, scooter, or bus, which are all ways you might get to local places like work, school, or the supermarket.

Transport is the name for whatever you use to get around. So if someone asked what form of transport you use to get to school, you might say “the bus” or “my car” or “a bike”, depending on how it is that you get to school.

So that’s transport.

Attractions

The next word is attractions.

What does attractions mean?

Well, in IELTS conversations about travel and places, “attractions” refers to tourist attractions, which are interesting places that tourists like to visit.

Attractions are often places with historical or cultural value, such as cathedrals, museums, or other landmarks, like the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Attractions can also be places of great natural beauty, like the Great Barrier Reef in Australia or the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

The root of the word attractions is attract, which means to make someone interested in something. So attractions are the interesting places that tourists and travelers want to visit.

So that’s attractions.

High Rise

The final word today is high rise.

What does high rise mean?

Well, a “high rise” is a very tall building, often seen in a city center. High rise buildings are especially common in and around the main square of a city center or the downtown area. Another word for high rise is skyscraper, which you may have heard before.

Big cities like Tokyo and New York City have a lot of high rises, while smaller cities like San Francisco only have a few high rises, which are usually built in the center of the city.

If you can recognize a city just by looking at a photograph of it, you are probably recognizing the unique high rises that make up the city’s skyline. For example, the Empire State Building is one of New York City’s most recognizable high rises, and you’ll see its image on a lot of postcards from New York.

So that’s high rise.

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Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to travel – for more words, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

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