MCAT Sample Questions

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If you’re planning on taking the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), you need to know what you’re getting into! The best way to do this? Review MCAT sample questions at the start of your MCAT prep! As you do, you’ll be able to glean key information from test day, both in terms of what the exam tests and how the exam tests it!

In this post, you’ll find MCAT example questions for each section, plus a breakdown of what’s on real MCAT exams and where to find additional practice. Let’s get to it!


 

Table of Contents


 

MCAT Sample Questions

Just like medical school itself, the MCAT tests a wide variety of topics. The good news is that these are all topics that will be incredibly useful in your future medical education. Feel free to jump into the MCAT sample questions below, then read on to learn more about what to expect from the actual exam!
 
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Biology/Biochemistry

1.
Resistance to antibiotics in clinical isolates of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria is usually mediated by the presence of various enzymes that modify the antibiotic so that it can no longer interact with its target in the cell. The β-lactamases hydrolyze the penicillins and cephalosporins, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase acetylates chloramphenicol, and nine enzymes acetylate, phosphorylate, or adenylylate the aminoglycoside antibiotics.
 
The genetic loci coding for these enzymes are usually located on extrachromosomal elements, such as the R(antibiotic resistance)-factors in gram-negative bacteria. Since these genes are not normal chromosomal components of the resistant strains, there has been considerable speculation as to their origin.
 
Molecular studies have shown that R-factors consist of two parts that are reversibly dissociable. These are the resistance transfer factor (RTF), and the r-determinants, genes that determine resistance to antibiotics. It has been hypothesized that r-determinants exist somewhere in nature as chromosomal genes and that they are "picked-up" by bacteria to form R-factors. The question is, where do the r-determinants originate?
 
A search was initiated in the actinomycetes for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes like those that have been characterized in strains carrying R-factors (R+) in the belief that this might represent the r-determinant gene pool. The actinomycetes are a group of rod-shaped organisms that were once thought to be intermediates between bacteria and fungi. However, careful examination of their cellular dimensions, their cytology, and their genetics place them among the bacteria.
 
Table 1   Aminoglycoside acetylating, phosphorylating, and adenylylating enzymes in actinomycetes; (+) means enzyme activity was detected, (-) means no enzyme activity was detected.

Adapted from Benveniste, R., Davies, J. Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Inactivating Enzymes in Actinomycetes Similar to Those Present in Clinical Isolates of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 70, No. 8, pp. 2276-2280

 
A meningitis-causing bacteria is resistant to streptomycin and gentamicin C1a. The r-determinant genes responsible for this resistance may have originated from which of the following actinomycetes?
2.
Resistance to antibiotics in clinical isolates of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria is usually mediated by the presence of various enzymes that modify the antibiotic so that it can no longer interact with its target in the cell. The β-lactamases hydrolyze the penicillins and cephalosporins, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase acetylates chloramphenicol, and nine enzymes acetylate, phosphorylate, or adenylylate the aminoglycoside antibiotics.
 
The genetic loci coding for these enzymes are usually located on extrachromosomal elements, such as the R(antibiotic resistance)-factors in gram-negative bacteria. Since these genes are not normal chromosomal components of the resistant strains, there has been considerable speculation as to their origin.
 
Molecular studies have shown that R-factors consist of two parts that are reversibly dissociable. These are the resistance transfer factor (RTF), and the r-determinants, genes that determine resistance to antibiotics. It has been hypothesized that r-determinants exist somewhere in nature as chromosomal genes and that they are "picked-up" by bacteria to form R-factors. The question is, where do the r-determinants originate?
 
A search was initiated in the actinomycetes for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes like those that have been characterized in strains carrying R-factors (R+) in the belief that this might represent the r-determinant gene pool. The actinomycetes are a group of rod-shaped organisms that were once thought to be intermediates between bacteria and fungi. However, careful examination of their cellular dimensions, their cytology, and their genetics place them among the bacteria.
 
Table 1   Aminoglycoside acetylating, phosphorylating, and adenylylating enzymes in actinomycetes; (+) means enzyme activity was detected, (-) means no enzyme activity was detected.

Adapted from Benveniste, R., Davies, J. Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Inactivating Enzymes in Actinomycetes Similar to Those Present in Clinical Isolates of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 70, No. 8, pp. 2276-2280

 
Which of the following correctly describes individual actinomycetes according to their shape?
3.
Resistance to antibiotics in clinical isolates of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria is usually mediated by the presence of various enzymes that modify the antibiotic so that it can no longer interact with its target in the cell. The β-lactamases hydrolyze the penicillins and cephalosporins, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase acetylates chloramphenicol, and nine enzymes acetylate, phosphorylate, or adenylylate the aminoglycoside antibiotics.
 
The genetic loci coding for these enzymes are usually located on extrachromosomal elements, such as the R(antibiotic resistance)-factors in gram-negative bacteria. Since these genes are not normal chromosomal components of the resistant strains, there has been considerable speculation as to their origin.
 
Molecular studies have shown that R-factors consist of two parts that are reversibly dissociable. These are the resistance transfer factor (RTF), and the r-determinants, genes that determine resistance to antibiotics. It has been hypothesized that r-determinants exist somewhere in nature as chromosomal genes and that they are "picked-up" by bacteria to form R-factors. The question is, where do the r-determinants originate?
 
A search was initiated in the actinomycetes for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes like those that have been characterized in strains carrying R-factors (R+) in the belief that this might represent the r-determinant gene pool. The actinomycetes are a group of rod-shaped organisms that were once thought to be intermediates between bacteria and fungi. However, careful examination of their cellular dimensions, their cytology, and their genetics place them among the bacteria.
 
Table 1   Aminoglycoside acetylating, phosphorylating, and adenylylating enzymes in actinomycetes; (+) means enzyme activity was detected, (-) means no enzyme activity was detected.

Adapted from Benveniste, R., Davies, J. Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Inactivating Enzymes in Actinomycetes Similar to Those Present in Clinical Isolates of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 70, No. 8, pp. 2276-2280

 
Which of the following cellular aspects of actinomycetes likely led to their classification as bacteria rather than fungi?

Pyschology/Sociology

4.
The term "baby boomer" is used to describe anyone born in the United States between 1946 and 1964. As of 2011, baby boomers have been driving the growth of the senior citizen population, and by 2029, when all of the baby boomers are 65 years or older, it is projected that more than 20 percent of the U.S. population will be over the age of 65. By 2056, the population 65 years and over is projected to become larger than the population under 18 years.
 
Figure 1 shows the age and sex structure for the population of the United States between 1945 and 2012. The bulge in the pyramids are shaded in gray and represent the baby boomer cohort.
 
 
 
Figure 1 Age and Sex Structure of the Population for the United States: 1945 to 2012 (Numbers in millions)
 
The dependency ratio of a population can be defined as the ratio of the number of "dependent" members of a population to the number of "productive" members of the same population. In Western societies such as the United States, demographers measure the dependency ratio according to the following formula:
 
(Equation 1)
 
In the United States, the total dependency ratio increased steadily from 1945 to 1964, peaking at about 0.8 in 1964. After the baby boomers entered the workforce, the ratio decreased slowly until 2010, when it reached its nadir at 0.59. The projected dependency ratio for 2060 is 0.75, and this is mostly due to the large effect that the baby boomer generation will have.
 
Source: Adapted from Colby, Ortman, The Baby Boom Cohort in the United States: 2012 to 2060; United States Census. Issued May 2014 P25-1141
 
Which of the following graphs best illustrates the projected population of the baby boomers in the United States from 1946 to 2060?
5.
The term "baby boomer" is used to describe anyone born in the United States between 1946 and 1964. As of 2011, baby boomers have been driving the growth of the senior citizen population, and by 2029, when all of the baby boomers are 65 years or older, it is projected that more than 20 percent of the U.S. population will be over the age of 65. By 2056, the population 65 years and over is projected to become larger than the population under 18 years.
 
Figure 1 shows the age and sex structure for the population of the United States between 1945 and 2012. The bulge in the pyramids are shaded in gray and represent the baby boomer cohort.
 
 
 
Figure 1 Age and Sex Structure of the Population for the United States: 1945 to 2012 (Numbers in millions)
 
The dependency ratio of a population can be defined as the ratio of the number of "dependent" members of a population to the number of "productive" members of the same population. In Western societies such as the United States, demographers measure the dependency ratio according to the following formula:
 
(Equation 1)
 
In the United States, the total dependency ratio increased steadily from 1945 to 1964, peaking at about 0.8 in 1964. After the baby boomers entered the workforce, the ratio decreased slowly until 2010, when it reached its nadir at 0.59. The projected dependency ratio for 2060 is 0.75, and this is mostly due to the large effect that the baby boomer generation will have.
 
Source: Adapted from Colby, Ortman, The Baby Boom Cohort in the United States: 2012 to 2060; United States Census. Issued May 2014 P25-1141
 
Although the fertility rates observed during the baby boom were not the highest ever seen in the United States, the number of births during those years was the highest ever. This is most likely because:
6.
The term "baby boomer" is used to describe anyone born in the United States between 1946 and 1964. As of 2011, baby boomers have been driving the growth of the senior citizen population, and by 2029, when all of the baby boomers are 65 years or older, it is projected that more than 20 percent of the U.S. population will be over the age of 65. By 2056, the population 65 years and over is projected to become larger than the population under 18 years.
 
Figure 1 shows the age and sex structure for the population of the United States between 1945 and 2012. The bulge in the pyramids are shaded in gray and represent the baby boomer cohort.
 
 
 
Figure 1 Age and Sex Structure of the Population for the United States: 1945 to 2012 (Numbers in millions)
 
The dependency ratio of a population can be defined as the ratio of the number of "dependent" members of a population to the number of "productive" members of the same population. In Western societies such as the United States, demographers measure the dependency ratio according to the following formula:
 
(Equation 1)
 
In the United States, the total dependency ratio increased steadily from 1945 to 1964, peaking at about 0.8 in 1964. After the baby boomers entered the workforce, the ratio decreased slowly until 2010, when it reached its nadir at 0.59. The projected dependency ratio for 2060 is 0.75, and this is mostly due to the large effect that the baby boomer generation will have.
 
Source: Adapted from Colby, Ortman, The Baby Boom Cohort in the United States: 2012 to 2060; United States Census. Issued May 2014 P25-1141
 
Which of the following phenomena would likely increase the dependency ratio of a nation while simultaneously increasing its overall mortality rate?

Chemistry/Physics

7. What is the correct IUPAC name for the following compound?
 
8. All of the following are underlying assumptions/conclusions of the ideal gas law EXCEPT:
9.
Leukocyte NADPH oxidases are membrane-associated enzyme complexes that catalyze the production of superoxide (O2-1) via the one-electron reduction of dioxygen.
 
2O2 + NADPH → 2O2- + NADP+ + H+(Reaction 1)
 
The O2- produced by reaction 1 is an ROS (reactive oxygen species) that causes oxidative damage to biomolecules such as DNA and serves as the starting material for the production of a vast assortment of other reactive oxidants such as oxidized halogens, free radicals, and singlet oxygen.
 
Because of its reactivity, O2- has potent bactericidal effects, and when O2- is pumped into a phagosome en masse, any microbe the phagocyte has engulfed is quickly destroyed. Hence the presentation of a microbe to a phagocyte elicits the rapid consumption of O2 and production of O2-, a phenomenon known as a respiratory burst.
 
In order to quantitatively compare ROS production in neutrophils, monocytes, mast cells, and dendritic cells, a solution of 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) is prepared. H2DCFDA is a non-fluorescent, cell-permeable dye, which oxidizes to the fluorescent 2,7-dichlorofluorescein (DSF) in the presence of a strong enough oxidant (such as a ROS).
 
Two samples of each type of leukocyte are pipetted into different wells of a microplate and all eight wells are incubated with equal amounts of H2DCFDA for thirty minutes. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a compound known to induce a respiratory burst, is then added to one well of each leukocyte type. Fluorescence measurements are taken for all wells zero hours (i.e. immediately), one hour, and two hours following PMA addition. The results are shown in Table 1.
 
Table 1 Fluorescence measurements for PMA-induced and control leukocyte samples 
 
What is the minimum number of moles of NADPH required to produce 0.05 grams of superoxide by single electron reduction?

Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

10.
Museums have always been about more than housing art, be it in the service of the work itself (how to bring out certain aesthetic qualities) or by making a broader social statement. Yet, something less obvious than simply creating a distance between observer and the observed or curating the works of a specific artist is at play. What also informs the modern museum-going experience is the ‘who’ viewing the art and what exactly that person’s expectations of the experience are.
 
For much of the 20th century—and really all of the 19th century—to enter a museum was to be in the midst of Greatness. The requisite emotion was awe; the self was no longer the center of one’s attention. It helped if museum-goers were familiar with the story of art, so that they could direct that awe appropriately. Yet, this story served an even deeper purpose, as the transformation of the museum in the last fifty years has shown. Museum-goers demanded to be edified by that story. But now that story—that the past was a series of great masters to kneel before—is itself becoming a relic. The public has changed and, so the notion goes, so too must the museum.
 
The progressive-museum-going experience has its beginnings in the end of the 19th century, and has, since then, steadily grown in the United States. The idea is not only about housing artworks under a roof but about being an agent for social change. The museum as subversive. Or, if that is too ambitious, the museum has become not so much a custodian of great art as an institution that caters to the museum goer’s experience. But if that experience has become less about art, then what has it become more about?
 
One argument is that the museum needs to be more attuned to how an individual sees him- or herself against the backdrop of Art. Spaces for easy congregation, whether at a museum café or a large open area in between statues, are addressing this need. Installation art, in which there is no art in the traditional sense, but a space created ad hoc, where the museum goer is part of the experience, is another trend highlighting a shift away from “unselfing.” Some maintain this renewed focus on the self is alarming, and point out that museums are trying to attract younger generations by offering “selfie spaces” where individuals can use smartphones to take pictures of themselves standing next to the likes of the David. This is an extreme example, given that many museums are not focused on pandering to the popular masses, and perhaps points more to how its proponents are clearly reactionary. Many of these critics insist on clinging to the traditional model, the one in which museums have become little more than bastions of stuffiness, an old-world order frozen in time, deaf to the sensibilities of a changing public.
 
What needs redefining is the simplistic dichotomy between upholding the value of Art and catering to the whims of the public. It misses the subtle dynamic of how the museum-going public both engages and disengages with conscious curatorial and structural adaptations. For instance, the public--underscoring the trend in placing the self at the center of the experience--has become more demanding of an interactive experience, not surprising given how digital technology itself is predicated on an individual-mediated response to the intake of information. One idea a museum could play with, if some have not already, is for the docent to go online, allowing the individual to “curate the experience” as she walks past works of art chosen with this end in mind. Museums might also experiment with other approaches; whether these involve classic works or collections outside of the western canon, or whether they can be described as installation art is besides the point. Saying that any of these approaches are compromised presupposes that there is only one experience. In fact, museums in the stuffy mold should still exist, but they should also be content with their diminished status.
 
Which of the following most captures the author’s attitude towards museums that cater to the “modern museum-going experience”?
11.
Museums have always been about more than housing art, be it in the service of the work itself (how to bring out certain aesthetic qualities) or by making a broader social statement. Yet, something less obvious than simply creating a distance between observer and the observed or curating the works of a specific artist is at play. What also informs the modern museum-going experience is the ‘who’ viewing the art and what exactly that person’s expectations of the experience are.
 
For much of the 20th century—and really all of the 19th century—to enter a museum was to be in the midst of Greatness. The requisite emotion was awe; the self was no longer the center of one’s attention. It helped if museum-goers were familiar with the story of art, so that they could direct that awe appropriately. Yet, this story served an even deeper purpose, as the transformation of the museum in the last fifty years has shown. Museum-goers demanded to be edified by that story. But now that story—that the past was a series of great masters to kneel before—is itself becoming a relic. The public has changed and, so the notion goes, so too must the museum.
 
The progressive-museum-going experience has its beginnings in the end of the 19th century, and has, since then, steadily grown in the United States. The idea is not only about housing artworks under a roof but about being an agent for social change. The museum as subversive. Or, if that is too ambitious, the museum has become not so much a custodian of great art as an institution that caters to the museum goer’s experience. But if that experience has become less about art, then what has it become more about?
 
One argument is that the museum needs to be more attuned to how an individual sees him- or herself against the backdrop of Art. Spaces for easy congregation, whether at a museum café or a large open area in between statues, are addressing this need. Installation art, in which there is no art in the traditional sense, but a space created ad hoc, where the museum goer is part of the experience, is another trend highlighting a shift away from “unselfing.” Some maintain this renewed focus on the self is alarming, and point out that museums are trying to attract younger generations by offering “selfie spaces” where individuals can use smartphones to take pictures of themselves standing next to the likes of the David. This is an extreme example, given that many museums are not focused on pandering to the popular masses, and perhaps points more to how its proponents are clearly reactionary. Many of these critics insist on clinging to the traditional model, the one in which museums have become little more than bastions of stuffiness, an old-world order frozen in time, deaf to the sensibilities of a changing public.
 
What needs redefining is the simplistic dichotomy between upholding the value of Art and catering to the whims of the public. It misses the subtle dynamic of how the museum-going public both engages and disengages with conscious curatorial and structural adaptations. For instance, the public--underscoring the trend in placing the self at the center of the experience--has become more demanding of an interactive experience, not surprising given how digital technology itself is predicated on an individual-mediated response to the intake of information. One idea a museum could play with, if some have not already, is for the docent to go online, allowing the individual to “curate the experience” as she walks past works of art chosen with this end in mind. Museums might also experiment with other approaches; whether these involve classic works or collections outside of the western canon, or whether they can be described as installation art is besides the point. Saying that any of these approaches are compromised presupposes that there is only one experience. In fact, museums in the stuffy mold should still exist, but they should also be content with their diminished status.
 
Which of the following is most inconsistent with the idea of “unselfing” as it is discussed in the passage?
12.
Museums have always been about more than housing art, be it in the service of the work itself (how to bring out certain aesthetic qualities) or by making a broader social statement. Yet, something less obvious than simply creating a distance between observer and the observed or curating the works of a specific artist is at play. What also informs the modern museum-going experience is the ‘who’ viewing the art and what exactly that person’s expectations of the experience are.
 
For much of the 20th century—and really all of the 19th century—to enter a museum was to be in the midst of Greatness. The requisite emotion was awe; the self was no longer the center of one’s attention. It helped if museum-goers were familiar with the story of art, so that they could direct that awe appropriately. Yet, this story served an even deeper purpose, as the transformation of the museum in the last fifty years has shown. Museum-goers demanded to be edified by that story. But now that story—that the past was a series of great masters to kneel before—is itself becoming a relic. The public has changed and, so the notion goes, so too must the museum.
 
The progressive-museum-going experience has its beginnings in the end of the 19th century, and has, since then, steadily grown in the United States. The idea is not only about housing artworks under a roof but about being an agent for social change. The museum as subversive. Or, if that is too ambitious, the museum has become not so much a custodian of great art as an institution that caters to the museum goer’s experience. But if that experience has become less about art, then what has it become more about?
 
One argument is that the museum needs to be more attuned to how an individual sees him- or herself against the backdrop of Art. Spaces for easy congregation, whether at a museum café or a large open area in between statues, are addressing this need. Installation art, in which there is no art in the traditional sense, but a space created ad hoc, where the museum goer is part of the experience, is another trend highlighting a shift away from “unselfing.” Some maintain this renewed focus on the self is alarming, and point out that museums are trying to attract younger generations by offering “selfie spaces” where individuals can use smartphones to take pictures of themselves standing next to the likes of the David. This is an extreme example, given that many museums are not focused on pandering to the popular masses, and perhaps points more to how its proponents are clearly reactionary. Many of these critics insist on clinging to the traditional model, the one in which museums have become little more than bastions of stuffiness, an old-world order frozen in time, deaf to the sensibilities of a changing public.
 
What needs redefining is the simplistic dichotomy between upholding the value of Art and catering to the whims of the public. It misses the subtle dynamic of how the museum-going public both engages and disengages with conscious curatorial and structural adaptations. For instance, the public--underscoring the trend in placing the self at the center of the experience--has become more demanding of an interactive experience, not surprising given how digital technology itself is predicated on an individual-mediated response to the intake of information. One idea a museum could play with, if some have not already, is for the docent to go online, allowing the individual to “curate the experience” as she walks past works of art chosen with this end in mind. Museums might also experiment with other approaches; whether these involve classic works or collections outside of the western canon, or whether they can be described as installation art is besides the point. Saying that any of these approaches are compromised presupposes that there is only one experience. In fact, museums in the stuffy mold should still exist, but they should also be content with their diminished status.
 
Which of the following best expresses the author’s main idea?

 


 
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What kind of questions are on the MCAT?

Section Overview

Here’s a quick overview of the sections you’ll see on the MCAT.

  • Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
    This section is pretty much what it says on the box. Bio and biochemistry topics not directly related to behavior appear here: everything from amino acids to organ systems.
  • Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
    Love chem and/or phys? This is your section! Plan on answering questions related to everything from light-matter interactions to water properties here.
  • Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
    This section of the MCAT tests topics related to behavior. This includes everything from how we make sense of the environment to characteristics of demographics. If you have a talent for social science, this is your section!
  • Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS)
    Here, you can expect to see verbal reasoning questions. But don’t be fooled by the familiar format—this is a next-level reading comprehension section! It’s crafted to test your reasoning skills through critical analysis of passages.

MCAT Question Format

If you’ve taken another standardized exam in the United States, like the SAT or the GRE, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to learn that the AAMC (the MCAT test-maker) has made one thing easy on you: the question format. All MCAT items are multiple-choice questions.

In other words, you can expect the format of the questions you see on the exam to be exactly like what you’re seeing in these MCAT sample questions. They’ll each have a prompt. Sometimes this is just a single sentence, sometimes it comes with a complex illustration of a scenario. It depends on the section.

Then, you’ll have four answer choices to choose from. These are always labeled A, B, C, and D. Even better news? There’s no wrong-answer penalty on the test. So if you’re hesitating between two choices and you’re running out of time, pick your favorite letter and move on.

In terms of what the questions test, that’s a whole different ballgame! You can expect to see hugely varied content on the MCAT exam, which probably doesn’t come as a surprise at this point. After all, an MCAT biological foundations question will necessarily be totally different from an MCAT psychological or sociology question.

Before test day (and hopefully before you go too far into your full-length MCAT practice tests!) you should take a quick look at an overview of what’s on the MCAT to know what you’re dealing with!

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Where to Find More MCAT Sample Questions

Now that you’ve seen what types of questions you’ll face on the MCAT, it’s time to get a better understanding of how the exam tests different kinds of knowledge. Here are a few good resources!

  • To get a snapshot of your current strengths and areas for improvement, try our free MCAT Diagnostic. This diagnostic will quiz your knowledge of the MCAT subjects!
  • Find out where you can get real MCAT exams and full-length practice tests with Magoosh’s MCAT practice tests post!
  • For practice problems, the test-maker offers a great collection of materials on the AAMC website.
  • For a new MCAT question every day, check out Magoosh’s MCAT Question of the Day post!

You can also find a great set of MCAT sample questions in Magoosh’s free MCAT practice test! Click below to access the free, full-length test.

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Sample MCAT Questions: Takeaways

If you answered these MCAT sample questions as you went along, it can be helpful to note the number of correct answers (and the number of mistakes) you made in each section. That way, as you set up your MCAT study plan, you’ll already be starting with a sense of your strengths and weaknesses for the best MCAT prep for you.

You can also use a full-length exam, such as an AAMC sample test, to give you insight into how MCAT scores work on the real exam.

There’s no doubt about it: the AAMC asks future medical students to know a ton of material. But by starting early and getting an overview of what the test covers, you’ve already taken the first step to setting yourself up for success!

Get a free MCAT practice test!

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