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How to Practice MAT Analogies in Daily Life

Outside of the many hours you spend studying directly from study guides or taking practice exams, you may be wondering how to practice MAT analogies in daily life. This is a great question, and looking for ways to work your studies into other aspects of your life is a great way to prepare.

MAT Flashcards

While flashcards might already be a key part of your normal study preparation, if you have them as a mobile app, they provide an excellent resource during any breaks in a day. Magoosh has a free MAT flashcard app that you can download and practice anywhere.

Flashcards can be used during commutes, lunch breaks, commercials, and any other time you might have. These mini practices will go a long way in helping you cultivate an affinity for thinking about analogies.

Daily Reading

If you are not already reading in preparation for the MAT, start right away. Not only is this a valuable resource for gaining new vocabulary, but the actual content of the articles will vastly improve your connection making abilities. Here is a list of resources for daily reading:

  1. The New York Times
  2. The Wall Street Journal
  3. BBC
  4. The Economist
  5. The MIT Technology Review
  6. Art & Letters Daily 
  7. The Atlantic
  8. Aeon

You should aim to read at least one article per day. Preferably, you should be reading topics of art, culture, philosophy, etc., rather than current news or politics.
How to Practice MAT Analogies in Daily Life - Reading

Use what you learn

Try to bring what you learn for the MAT into daily use. Use new words in reading and writing. If you learn an interesting fact, discuss it with someone, or decide to learn more about it (a quick read through a wiki page). Can you convert a measurement from inches to cm or Fahrenheit to Celsius? Can you count up to 100 using only the prime numbers? These are things you can do throughout the day (i.e. while driving home or standing in line).

If you think about it, there are numerous ways to use the small facts you learn to test yourself throughout the day (particularly with numbers). Start with the above and you’ll likely think of others.

About Bertrand

Bertrand is a remote tutor and a MAT blogger for Magoosh. He received a B.A. from Fairleigh Dickinson University and studied education theory at Rutgers Graduate School of Education. He has been studying and working in education since 2010. Born and raised in New Jersey, he now resides in Philadelphia. When he isn’t helping students study or writing blogs for Magoosh, he spends his time practicing mixed martial arts and reading as much as his schedule permits.

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