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Thomas Broderick

Average ACT Score by State

In such a numbers-obsessed world, it’s easy to become obsessed with comparing your own “numbers” to the numbers of others. Who has more Instagram followers? Who has the better GPA? Who can eat the most Peeps in 30 seconds? And who can blow the average ACT score out of the water with their intellectual prowess?

So it’s easy to understand why we want to know how our test scores compare to average ACT scores. There are lots of different averages we can use, but let’s start by taking a look at the big-picture data.

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Average ACT Scores by the Numbers

In 2016, US students averaged a composite score of 20.8 on the ACT, broken down like this:

ACT Test (Section)Average Score (2016)
English20.1
Math20.6
Reading21.3
Science20.8
Composite20.8

However, keep in mind that these numbers come from an incredibly large pool of students (over 2 million, to be exact) each of whom is taking the ACT for different reasons.

Average ACT scores also vary by state. Why? A couple reasons: varied curriculums, different state standards for high school graduation, and preparation for diverse tests proving that students have met those standards come to mind.

So the overall averages are really not all that helpful in contextualizing your score. Instead, let’s look at average SAT scores by state, then see how you can use them to your advantage.

State ACT Score Averages

Here are the average ACT scores by state, plus information about the percentage of students who meet national performance benchmarks.

Average ACT Score by State (2016)

StatePercent of Graduates TestedAverage Composite ScoreMet English Benchmark (%)Met Reading Benchmark (%)Met Math Benchmark (%)Met Science Benchmark (%)
Alabama10019.151342324
Alaska5320.055423731
Arizona5820.155393831
Arkansas9620.260403230
California3322.672555645
Colorado10020.661423936
Connecticut3424.585686861
Delaware2123.680656152
District of Columbia4422.261524745
Florida8119.953423329
Georgia6021.165474036
Hawaii9418.746303023
Idaho3922.777605446
Illinois10020.864424136
Indiana4122.372565346
Iowa6822.173554846
Kansas7421.970534843
Kentucky10020.059403130
Louisiana10019.558352627
Maine1023.681636654
Maryland2723.074595751
Massachusetts2824.885717461
Michigan10020.360403635
Minnesota7822.774575853
Mississippi10018.446272019
Missouri10020.259403532
Montana10020.356413832
National6420.861444136
Nebraska8821.468484340
Nevada10017.737262118
New Hampshire2324.586697061
New Jersey3223.175596150
New Mexico7019.953393128
New York2923.479656758
North Carolina10019.147343226
North Dakota10020.358413833
Ohio7322.069534945
Oklahoma8220.461453232
Oregon3921.767514942
Pennsylvania2323.177616152
Rhode Island2923.379626052
South Carolina10018.544302521
South Dakota7621.970545146
Tennessee10019.958383030
Texas4620.657434235
Utah10020.259423533
Vermont2923.480626254
Virginia3123.378635953
Washington2523.173606152
West Virginia6720.767463233
Wisconsin10020.560414137
Wyoming10020.258383331
National6420.861444136
This chart contains 2016 data on the percent of high school graduates who took the ACT, average composite scores, and the percent of tested students who met subject benchmarks. The data is organized by U.S. state.

Data from The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2016 by ACT

That’s a lot of information, so let’s break it down. The table gives us the average composite score for each state, as well as the percentage of students who met readiness benchmarks in English, Reading, Science and Math.

What’s a Readiness Benchmark?

We’re talking about college readiness. ACT has done a lot of research and I invite you to read it, but for those of you on a tight schedule, this is how the ACT evaluates college readiness:

  • ACT scores (or other standardized test scores) are the SECOND most valuable predictor of college success, after high school grades.
  • The “benchmark” scores for each section show the threshold above which students can expect to be reasonably prepared for college courses in this subject area.
  • In each state, a different percentage of test-takers meets or exceeds the benchmarks every year, as we can see above.

What Average ACT Scores by State Mean for Everyone

Benchmarks are one way of determining college readiness and what constitutes a “good” ACT score, and more reliable than comparing your score to the 20.8 average. But as we’ve seen, test scores in one state are not perfectly comparable to scores from another state—the 100% test rate in some states shows us that, in places, all students, not just those who are determined to go to college, take this exam. This most likely lowers that state’s composite score.

A Better Way to Put Your Score in Context

In other words, to get a better idea of how your scores stack up, it can be helpful to look at data from a smaller pool of students—preferably some who have had a similar education.

  • First of all, you can look at average ACT scores for your state.

Although you will find that scores don’t vary drastically between states, you may live in a slightly less or more competitive one.

  • You can look at average ACT scores for your school.

Many students can access this data on their high school’s “Profile” sheet. This might be posted on your school’s website or you can ask your college counseling department for it. In fact, this is a really crucial piece of paper. Did you know that this is the info colleges use to understand how your high school compares to other high schools, as well as how you compare with to fellow students? Information is valuable, people!

An Even Better Way

A more helpful way to evaluate your ACT scores? Compare them to the average ACT scores at the colleges or universities you are targeting.

If you don’t have a college list yet (or even if you do), I highly recommend doing some exploratory research by reading our ACT Score Range post and searching on our ACT Score Range tables, a great free tool you can use to find the average test scores at the top 100 U.S. universities.

Some colleges are still stuck in the stone age, only publishing average SAT scores. If this is the case, first double-check that they accept ACT scores (most will, don’t worry!). Then, you can easily convert this SAT score to an ACT score to see where your scores shake out. (Check out our ACT to New SAT to Old SAT Conversion Chart!)

The Magoosh Answer

Your ACT score can be a very important factor in determining college admissions. So make sure to arm yourself with all of the above facts and figures before you set your ACT goals. But it’s also important to keep in mind that your ACT scores are only one part of who you are as an applicant—you have lots of other talents to offer a college.

And, don’t forget the most important person to be comparing yourself to is…you.

So if you studied hard and increased your ACT score from a 16 to a 20, that is a huge win! You are now way better prepared than “average you” was before. And that’s what really counts.

improve your act score. Get a 4-point increase guaranteed

Bottom Line: What All this Average ACT Score Info Means for You

Why would you care what the average ACT score is in your state? A lot of colleges and universities have admissions officers who focus on a particular region. Believe me, they’re more than familiar with what the average score looks like in your area! Also, if you’re applying to college in a particular state with a lot of in-state applicants, it’s good to know approximately where you stand in terms of the admissions pool.

So if your score is slightly lower than average for the college—but far above average in your state—it might not hurt your chances as much as you think it might. In fact, it may even help you!

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About Thomas Broderick

Thomas spent four years teaching high school English, social studies, and ACT preparation in Middle Tennessee. Now living in Northern California, he is excited to share his knowledge and experience with Magoosh's readers. In his spare time Thomas enjoys writing short fiction and hiking in the Sonoma foothills.


6 Responses to “Average ACT Score by State”

  1. Misty says:

    How do ACT scores look for 2016 with the new revisions?are the scores lower? The test seems more difficult…

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert Magoosh Test Prep Expert says:

      They haven’t really compiled the data for 2016 yet, so that’s a really good question! The recent changes to the ACT aren’t actually designed to make the test more difficult. So new scores shouldn’t be impacted– in theory at least. It’s possible that students may find the new format changes more challenging. Only time will tell, although if that does prove to be the case, the ACT will probably try to make a few more adjustments, as “more difficult” was not what they were aiming for.

  2. Mom says:

    My son said when he looked around, no one was finished with the specific sections and that everyone was just filling in the bubbles as quickly as they could.
    As a parent, running out of time and guessing is not a true indication of intelligence. I’m not happy with this new test. .

  3. Carol says:

    My son said the same thing! He and most everyone else were not able to complete most sections. He just marked random answers in case he hit one right. I felt the same way, not enough time and then guessing is not a true sign of what their capabilities are today.

  4. bethy says:

    Mom and Carol, I would have to respectfully disagree with you. The ACT is designed with the strict and fast paced time schedule because it is intended to test both knowledge of the student and their time management skills. In the workforce, looking beyond college, companies look for the employee that can work well and efficiently under stressful circumstances and meet timely deadlines.
    I am actually a current junior in high school right now and just took the ACT in April. This is just what I have concluded from my experience taking and preparing for the standardized ACT test.

  5. Student says:

    In every ACT I’ve ever taken, I along with about half of the students in the room with me have finished their section when the buzzer goes off. As for a measure of intelligence, those that do not finish are showing, by getting most if not all of their guessed answers wrong, that they are unable to complete the test material in the allotted time. Their inability is a test result.

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