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Announcement! As of August 1, 2019, the TOEFL Reading, Listening and Speaking sections will be shortened. The TOEFL will also make changes to its prep materials and scoring system. Because of this, some of the info in our blog posts may not yet reflect the new exam format. We cover all the changes here.
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Announcement! As of August 1, 2019, the TOEFL Reading, Listening and Speaking sections will be shortened. The TOEFL will also make changes to its prep materials and scoring system. Because of this, some of the info in our blog posts may not yet reflect the new exam format. We cover all the changes here.
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TOEFL Tuesday: Partial grading for 2-point questions

Have you ever wondered how points are awarded for TOEFL questions that have more than one correct answer? If you have, you’ve come to the right place! In this TOEFL Tuesday video, I explain how partial credit works for 2 point TOEFL questions. There are also TOEFL questions that are worth 3 points, and even some that are worth 4! We’ll talk about those as well in the video. However, know that the 2 point questions are the ones the show up most often on the test.  

The Final Reading Question

The last question on each reading passage is always worth more than one point. You’ll see either 3 or 4 reading passages on the TOEFL, so you’ll get 3 or 4 reading questions that are worth more than just one point. The final reading question is usually worth 2 points, but could also be worth 3 points or 4.

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Know that you might also get a Listening question that is worth more than one point. These questions are graded the same way the reading questions are (which we’ll explain below).

A Note About Points

When we’re talking about questions that are worth two points, we’re not talking about points on the 0 – 30 scale. This is the scaled score that you get for each section of the TOEFL. This score is calculated using what’s called a “raw score,” which is comes from the actual number of points you get on each question. So if you get 2 points for one question, those 2 points count directly towards your raw score (not your scaled score). If you’d like to learn more about how the raw score and the scaled score work, you can read about that in this blog post

How Partial Grading Works

When a question is worth more than one point, your score for that question decreases from the maximum by one point for each right answer that you miss. Questions that are worth two points will have three correct answers. So if you choose all three correct answers, you’ll get two points. If you choose two correct answers, you’ll get one point. And if you choose one correct answer (or none), you won’t get any points for that question.

Let’s talk about another example: imagine that you get a question that’s worth 4 points. These questions have 7 correct answers! If you choose all 7 correct answers, you’ll get 4 points. If you choose 6 correct answers you’ll get 3 points, and if you chose 5 correct answers you’ll get 2 points. If you only choose 4 correct answers you’ll get 1 point. Finally, if you choose less than 4 correct answers, you won’t get any points for that question.

 

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4 Responses to TOEFL Tuesday: Partial grading for 2-point questions

  1. Amir May 15, 2019 at 2:20 am #

    Hi Lucas
    Thanks for the video.
    The more important question about points in raw scores is that, is there any other question rather than the last question- summary- having more than one point? In other words, does every question in reading part has one point except the last question? It is important to me because I got 23 scaled score in the reading section. It means that I lost 13 points out of the total 45 points in my raw scores that I believe was impossible unless some of my mistakes were from questions such as the inference or rhetoric questions which might have had more than one point. Maybe I am wrong;

    • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
      Magoosh Test Prep Expert May 20, 2019 at 7:14 pm #

      Hi Amir!

      Both summary and categorization questions are worth more than one point.

      Summary questions can appear at the end, have 3 answers, and are worth 2 points.

      0 or 1 correct answer earns no points.
      2 correct answers earns 1 point.
      3 correct answers gets the full 2 points.

      Categorization questions can also appear at the very end of the question set. They have 5 answers, and are worth 3 points.

      1 or 2 correct answers earns 0 points.
      3 correct answers earns 1 point.
      4 correct answers earns 2 points.
      5 correct answers will get a student the full 3 points.

      I hope this helps clear things up. 🙂 Feel free to reply if it doesn’t.

      • Amir May 25, 2019 at 6:54 am #

        Hi Lucas,

        Thanks for your complete reply.

        There are also two important questions about the listening part:

        1)In a multiple-choice question with two answers, which is very common in TOEFL test, if we only answer(click) one right choice, do we get any point? Do these questions have two raw points or they have just one point with the two correct answers.

        2) I see tables about “TOEFL Scoring for Listening” on the internet. They show that if we get 33 out of 34 in raw score, our scaled score will be 28 that seems kind of irrational to me. And also with 32 in raw score, we will likely to get 26. Is it true?

        Best regards,

        • Magoosh Test Prep Expert
          Magoosh Test Prep Expert June 5, 2019 at 3:24 pm #

          Hi Amir! Here’s a video that explains how questions with more than one answers are score: https://magoosh.com/toefl/2016/toefl-tuesday-partial-grading-2-point-questions/
          As for the raw to scaled score conversion, remember that the scaled score is out of 30 for each section, so it’s certainly possible that a raw score that’s just below the total number of possible points would convert to close to 30 but below it. I hope that helps!


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