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TOEFL Tuesday: Official Magoosh Listening Practice

You’re in for a treat this week: we’re going to play one of Magoosh TOEFL’s listening videos for you. This video is practice material for our paid students, but you can listen to it for free, here. 🙂
 

Before you watch

First, let’s go over what is actually in the TOEFL listening section.

You will see an image—sometimes a few images—in the video, but mostly you will just be listening. There will be a recording of one to three people speaking. Each recording is just a few minutes long (from three to five, mostly).

There are three types of recordings on the TOEFL listening:

  • Lecture
  • Classroom discussion
  • Conversation

In this week’s TOEFL Tuesday video, we’re going to hear a conversation. That means there will be two people speaking in the recording: one student and one other person. The second person might be a teacher, a librarian, an advisor, an office worker at the school, or any other person who works at the school campus.

Now, if you haven’t watched it already, start that video and hear the conversation!


 

After you watch

…alright, now I’m assuming you’ve listened to it. That conversation between a student and an employee in at the registrar is typical of a real, official TOEFL conversation. But on the real test, after you hear it, you need to answer the questions!

There will be five questions after any conversation, including a few different types. The first question is usually a “main purpose” question. That type of question asks why the conversation happened.

After that, you will see a few different types of questions that ask about details—pieces of information that were said at different times in the conversation. Having good notes and a good memory is key! Keep in mind that you can’t listen a second time. Only on specific questions will the test give you a short replay, but you cannot control how much is replayed or when. Then, after the five questions are finished, you move on to the next listening task—probably a lecture or a classroom discussion!
 

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