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Taking the February 2017 LSAT? Here’s What to Know

With the December LSAT deadlines now history, you don’t have any more options to take the LSAT this year. That means you’re stuck waiting until 2017 to sit for the exam. But, it’s not exactly the end of the world. I took the LSAT in February 2010, rocked it, and still got accepted into the school I wanted that same year. I started law school in the day program at the University of Denver in August of the same year. Just remember, you’ll be very rushed with the application process if you don’t do it right.

But, before we get into the details, here is one bit of information you definitely need to have handy: the exam is on February 4, 2017. Don’t forget it! If you sign up for this date, be sure you put a calendar on every single wall in your house, and circle the date with a red sharpie. (I’m only mostly kidding.)

The other thing you need to know is that this test is not disclosed! That means you won’t have access to any of the questions. You’ll only be able to look at your actual score, your score band, percentile rank, and your writing sample. That’s a bummer if your score is worse than you were hoping. Figuring out which questions you missed is pretty much impossible without getting access to them.

Here’s all the important dates you need to know for the February 2017 LSAT, along with our top tips for preparing for the February 2017 LSAT.

February 2017 LSAT Registration Deadlines

  • December 14, 2016 – Non-published test center registration deadline (this is for those of you who live far away from and can’t travel to a published test center).
  • December 21, 2016 – Published test center registration deadline.
  • December 28, 2016 – Late registration deadline (you’ll have to pay an additional $90 to sign up late.)

If you think you may need to register for a non-published test center, check out the official LSAT web page. There is no late registration for a non-published test center. So, if you miss the deadline, you’re out of luck.

You also need to know that there is limited seating at a bunch of the test-center locations. That means if you wait until the registration deadline, you could find yourself out of luck, and unable to take the test in the city of your choice. That would be a real bummer.
Need more LSAT practice? Start your online LSAT prep today.

Other September LSAT Deadlines

Just in case you were wondering, once you register, you can do a few things. You can change your test date, or your test center location. You can also cancel your registration, or, if you miss the cancellation deadline, you can at least withdraw your registration.

  • January 10, 2017 – this is the deadline to change your test date, your location, or cancel your registration without forfeiting your entire registration fee.
  • February 3, 2016 – this is the deadline to withdraw your registration. Keep in mind that you won’t be getting any money back if you withdraw from the exam after the January 10th deadline.

If you decide to change your test date, or your test center, you’re going to have to pay an additional $90.00. Also, even if you cancel by January 10th, you are still only going to get part of your registration fee back … $50 to be exact. To request a refund, you’re going to need to fill out this form, and either mail, email, or fax it to LSAC here:

LSAC
PO BOX 2000-T
Newtown PA 18940
Fax: 215.968.1277
Email: LSACrefunds@LSAC.org

It’s going to take at least three weeks for you to get your money back. Since the LSAC loves to keep its money, I’d really suggest you make sure you are ready to take the LSAT when you sign up. If you don’t, you could find yourself taking a test you’re not prepared for, or out almost $300. While there are plenty of worse situations out there, this one is easily avoidable.

February 2017 LSAT Score Release Dates

Everyone gets their scores back in the mail, and it usually takes just over a month. While that’s not very long, at least compared to the bar exam, the wait can be pretty brutal, especially if you’re anything like me and you decide to take the February LSAT, when the score comes back days before many of the law school application deadlines.

Luckily, you can also opt in and receive your LSAT score via email. While it’s not the “official” score letter, you’ll get your score a full week earlier. For the September 2016 LSAT, here are the release dates for email.

  • March 2, 2017 – email release date.
  • March 9, 2017 – mail release date.

You will only get an email of your score if you create an online account with LSAC. You also need to know that the mailing date is just that. It’s a mailing date. That means you can add an additional five to seven business days. That means you’re looking at getting your score in the mail no sooner than March 14, 2016.

Some Tips and Pointers for the February 2017 LSAT

Choosing an LSAT test date

If you’re uncertain about whether or not the February LSAT is the date for you, we have a full breakdown on LSAT test dates, including which test date best matches up with your goals and application deadlines and how long you should study for.

Studying

If you’re ready to prep, check out our LSAT study plans!

We also have tips on where to find the best free LSAT practice tests. Take as many as you can, and work extra hard on getting sections of the test done within the time limit.

Understanding LSAT scores

You’re going to want to have a pretty good idea what score you need to get before you register for the LSAT. You’re also going to need to know what LSAT percentiles look like, and whether you can improve your score enough to get where you want to be. This is really important. If you are only a few points below where you want to be, go ahead and sign up. On the other hand, if you need to increase your score by more than 7 points, you might want to hold off on the February 2017 LSAT and consider June to give yourself a little more time to prepare, assuming that works with your deadlines.

You’re probably also wondering what is a good LSAT score for your target schools? Well, we’ve got you covered there too.

Top LSAT Tips

Here are some of our favorite pointers, whether you are just getting started, or polishing up those skills:

 

By the way, improve your LSAT score with Magoosh online test prep!

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