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Molly Kiefer

MIT Admissions: The SAT, ACT Scores, and GPA You Need to Get In

MIT admissions how to get into MIT sat scores MIT act scores -magoosh

The Short Answer

Because we care about you, and we know you like the short answer.

MIT Average SAT ScoreMIT Average ACT ScoreMIT Acceptance RateMIT Average GPA
154034-357.2%4.13

surprised meme -magoosh

Pretty intimidating stuff…but don’t worry, there’s a lot more to a successful college application than just your GPA and test scores!

However, almost all schools require that applicants submit either SAT or ACT results to be considered for admission. So tackling those tests is a great place to start. And we’re here to help!

Now keep reading for a whole lot of information about MIT admissions: MIT SAT Scores (…or MIT ACT Scores, if that’s what you’re into), GPA, and heaps of demographics and admissions data.

Once you know what to aim for, we’ll talk about how to get into MIT, especially when it comes to getting your scores where they need to be.

And Now…The Long Answer

So you’re thinking about applying the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. What’s that about?

Well–whether you come from an MIT legacy family, or just recently learned what the acronym stands for–there are a ton of reasons to set your sights on this gem of a university:

 

    • MIT has huge name recognition worldwide…the school is currently ranked as the 5th Best National University, the 5th Best Value School, and tied for the number 1 spot in High School Counselor Rankings. It’s definitely one of the best universities out there!

 

    • MIT’s median alumni starting salary of $76,900. Not bad for a starting salary!

 

    • The student-faculty ratio at MIT is 3:1, and the school has 69.6 percent of its classes with fewer than 20 students, which is especially impressive for a large research institution.

 

    • MIT is known for it’s engineering school, but it also boasts top rated programs in finance and in economics.

 

    • Sixty percent of full-time MIT undergraduates receive need-based financial aid, averaging $45,147, which is a nice chunk of change to help offset your costs before that starting salary kicks in.

 

    • You’ll get to spend four years (and then probably also all the years after that) around super smart, inspiring people. You belong together!

 

MIT SAT Scores

Okay, let’s dive in. Here are the most recent MIT SAT scores for students who submitted SAT scores and were admitted to MIT in 2017!

MIT Average SAT ScoreMIT 25th-75th Percentile SAT Score Range: CompositeMIT 25th-75th Percentile SAT Score Range: EBRWMIT 25th-75th Percentile SAT Score Range: Math
1540[1500, 1580][730, 780][770, 800]

What does all this mean?

Well, for a start, it means the top 25% of students admitted to MIT this year earned a combined SAT score of over 1580 (which most likely means scoring well over 750 on both parts of the SAT).

The middle 50% earned between 1500 and 1580.

And the bottom 25% earned below 1500. Therefore, 75% of MIT’s current sophomore class scored above a 1500 on the SAT…pretty impressive!

Liam got a 35 on the act. Get a higher act score.

It’s generally a good practice to aim for an SAT score around the 75th percentile of whatever the school you’re looking at has recently admitted. Having a concrete goal will help you focus your studying, and hitting the 75th percentile of MIT SAT scores will give you a really nice cushion as you go into the admissions process.

Check out the tables below for more detailed breakdowns how students scored on what portions of the SAT.

MIT SAT Scores (Math)ApplicantsAdmits Admit rate
750-8009,34197110%
700-7402,430773%
650-6901,29671%
600-64057700%
< 60044600%

MIT SAT Scores (EBRW)ApplicantsAdmits Admit rate
750-8005,40967713%
700-7404,0202717%
650-6902,441823%
600-6401,300242%
< 60092010%

While MIT may be your dream school, chances are that there other schools on your list too. For that reason, we’ve put together a post covering the SAT score range for each of the top 100 colleges and universities in America. More than one goal score never hurt anyone!

MIT ACT Scores

Moving on!

MIT 25th-75th Percentile ACT Score Range: CompositeMIT 25th-75th Percentile ACT Score Range: EnglishMIT 25th-75th Percentile ACT Score Range: Math
[34, 35][34, 36][34, 36]

Same drill as before.

For students who submitted ACT scores and were admitted to MIT in 2017, the 25th percentile of MIT ACT scores came in at 34; the 75th percentile of MIT ACT scores landed all the way up at 35.

Shooting for the 75th percentile of MIT ACT scores will make your own score competitive, so try to aim for a 35 or higher! (Not that it gets much higher…)

Here’s another breakdown, so you can get a better feel for what you’re dealing with than just “Aim for basically a perfect score!” 😉

MIT ACT Scores (Composite)ApplicantsAdmits Admit rate
34-365,501 59911%
31-332,934 1475%
28-30962283%
25-2739831%
< 25277 00%

MIT ACT Scores (English)ApplicantsAdmits Admit rate
34-366,272 62910%
31-331,789835%
28-30976455%
25-27557173%
< 2547831%
MIT ACT Scores (Math)ApplicantsAdmitsAdmit rate
34-366,09464011%
31-332,2611235%
28-301,036141%
25-2751000%
< 2517100%

MIT Acceptance Rate

As we mentioned in the Short Answer, the MIT admissions rate in 2017 was 7.2%. Well strap in, because things are about to get a lot more specific:

Freshman applications 20,247
Freshman admits 1,452
Percentage admitted7.2%
Early Action applicants 8,413
Admitted Early Action 657
Deferred to Regular Action5,966
Deferred applicants admitted
during Regular Action
225
Regular Action applicants11,834
Total considered during Regular Action (including deferred students)17,800
Admitted Regular Action
(including deferred students)
781 (plus 14 wait list)
Offered a place on the wait list527
Number admitted from the wait list14
U.S. Citizens/Permanent Residents applied15,594
U.S. Citizens/Permanent Residents admitted 1,317
International Students applied4,653
International Students admitted 135

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MIT GPA Average

MIT actually doesn’t officially report the GPAs of its admitted students–but based on data from more than 1,000 schools, the average GPA of a freshman at MIT is 4.13.

As you probably are aware, high schools generally use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, meaning you would have to be taking plenty of AP or IB classes (and racking up A’s across the board) to be averaging a 4.13.

MIT Freshmen Profile

Ready to go all the way down the rabbit hole? If I remember anything about applying to college, it’s that I was obsessed with any and all information about which students were getting into my school of choice (even when it was bad for me, like Cate Blanchett in Indiana Jones).

MIT Freshman Profile (2017-2018)

MIT admissions -magoosh

With that in mind, here’s demographic data on MIT’s most recent incoming class…almost certainly more than you could ever want to know about how to get into MIT.

Male50%
Female50%
White/Caucasian 39%
Native America 3%
African American 14%
Latino 14%
Asian/Asian America290%
Other1%
US Citizens & Permanent Residents
84%
International Citizens16%
Declared Major: Mathematics and Natural Science29%
Declared Major: Social Sciences23%
Declared Major: Arts and Humanities23%
Declared Major: Engineering23%
Undeclared2%
Total Applicants37,389
Total Admits2,183
Admit Rate5.8%
Early Decision Applicants4,086
Admitted students in top 10% of their graduating class90%
Students receiving Pell Grants16%
First Generation College Students17%
Total Students Attending1,456
Number of Countries Represented76

MIT Admissions FAQ

In the unlikely event that–even after learning the most common boy’s and girl’s names in MIT admissions–you still have questions, we threw together some handy FAQs (because, remember, we care about you).

MIT admissions -magoosh

Q. Tell me how to get into MIT…do I need perfect test scores?
A. Well, the higher your scores, the better, but honestly you’d be better off applying with average test scores and impressive extracurriculars than with perfect scores and mediocre extracurriculars. MIT wants to admit people, not statistics! According to Ashley C. from Transizion:

“MIT seeks students who are prepared to join a community ‘dedicated to applying science and technology to solutions that improve the world.’ The admissions team would love to hear about your high school robotics club or the gadgets you’ve created in your spare time.

As you sit down to work on your application, brainstorm the following:

  • How can you convey your passion for science, mathematics, and technology? What do you love about these fields? What makes you curious? How do you pursue these interests in your spare time?
  • Have you used your STEM skills to solve problems or give back to your community?
  • How do you envision using these skills in the future, and why is MIT the best school to help you achieve your goals?

This doesn’t mean you should only talk about STEM in your application; feel free to discuss your basketball handles, love of jazz music, or stellar baking skills as well. But write from the heart about your passion for STEM and your innovative, curious spirit.

Weave specific details about your relevant interests, intellectual pursuits, and meaningful experiences throughout the application, and you’ll show that you’re a great fit for MIT.”

According to ronayw on AdmitSee, the summer is a great time to pursue the interests that MIT likes to see!

“I came from a smaller high school in a non-competitive state, so I didn’t know anything about how to spend my summers in high school! After coming to MIT, I heard about so many opportunities I wish I’d known about. If you’re interested in math, look into Ross or PROMYS. If you like science, there’s SSP and Clark Scholars and for girls there’s WTP. For humanities folks, there’s the leadership program Notre Dame runs, as well as TASP. And APPLY EARLY [to these programs]! Keep on top of deadlines, many are in January or February.”

Q. Is MIT is super-competitive and cutthroat?
A. Actually, MIT is a very collaborative place…probably because the programs are so challenging that everyone could use the help!

Q. Will it be easier to get into MIT if I apply as a humanities major?
A. No.

Q. Can I survive at MIT without being a child prodigy?
A. It’s more important to be hardworking than brilliant. Everyone meets their boundaries eventually, and when that happens, you’ll need a good work ethic in order to keep on pushing.

The Takeaway

MIT is extremely selective, so a high standardized test score and GPA will be vital to your chances of getting in. And while you can’t go back in time and change your grades, you can always retake the SAT or ACT if you aren’t satisfied with your scores.

But before you head to the testing center, make sure you’re well prepared. After all, these exams are long, difficult, and cost money.

Find a study schedule that suits your needs, using a test prep program that works for you…I recommend checking out the Free 1-Week SAT Trial or the Free 1-Week ACT Trial from Magoosh–maybe it’ll be your cup of tea.

We’re here to help you build the best possible college application…but whatever test prep you end up using, just make sure it’s high quality.

If you’ve prepared yourself to the best of your ability, then there’s nothing to regret.

With any luck you’ll be heading to Massachusetts in the Fall.

But for now, you better get studying! 🙂

Improve your SAT or ACT score, guaranteed. Start your 1 Week Free Trial of Magoosh SAT Prep or your 1 Week Free Trial of Magoosh ACT Prep today!

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About Molly Kiefer

Molly completed her undergraduate degree in Philosophy at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. She has been tutoring the SAT, GRE, and LSAT since 2014, and loves supporting her students as they work towards their academic goals. When she’s not tutoring or blogging, Molly takes long walks, makes art, and studies ethics. Molly currently lives in Northern California with her cat, who is more popular on Instagram than she is.


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