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Category: SAT Pronouns

Chris Lele

Pronouns on the SAT — Grammar Fundamentals

Every time you see a pronoun on the SAT that pronoun should be clearly linked to a noun. That noun is what we call the antecedent. Typically, it will come before the pronoun, although not always.

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Tanya Shah

Pronouns: Tricks, Traps, and Ruses—Oh My!

The SAT Writing section’s multiple choice questions are designed with several go-to errors, thrown in to trick you. With a keen focus, you’ll recognize them as soon as they rear their ugly, grammatically incorrect heads. Going forward, we’ll examine some common pitfalls (and examples) so you’ll know what to look for and how to outsmart […]

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Lucas Fink

Pronouns in SAT Writing Multiple Choice

SAT writing questions are all about knowing what can go wrong. If you see a verb underlined, for example, you should know to double check the tense. If you see a pronoun underlined, there are a few things you should be on the lookout for. For the most part, they have to do with finding […]

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Lucas Fink

Common SAT Mistakes: “and I” vs. “and me”

The stereotypical English teacher has a few grammar rule favorites, some of which are, unfortunately, not even real rules. Do you remember the childhood saying “step on a crack, break your mother’s back”? Imagine if that was so ubiquitous (a good SAT word—look it up!) that everyone repeated it any time you stepped on a […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Writing Essentials: Pronouns

Here are the two big things you have to know about pronouns. A pronoun refers to a noun in the sentence. A pronoun can either take the Subject Case or the Object Case. Mary lent her book to Tom. She told him to return it to her soon. In these two sentences we have the […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Writing: Pronoun Agreement

Pronouns are commonly tested on the SAT Writing section. The good news is that unlike typical SAT idioms or parallelism this is a pretty easy question type to master. So let’s first start with the basics: He called me. I called him.   In the first sentence Mike is the subject. He is the thing […]

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