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Category: SAT Writing Section

Lucas Fink

Adverbs vs. Adjectives on the SAT

The SAT doesn’t test the parts of speech—by which I mean you don’t need to be able to define “adverb”—but using them correctly and spotting errors will earn you points in the writing sections. If you did many Madlibs as a kid, you know your parts of speech already. But in case you didn’t, let’s […]

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Lucas Fink

Style Errors in SAT Writing Multiple Choice Sections

For the most part, the sentences and passages that the SAT gives you in the writing sections have purely grammatical errors. For example, there may be problems in subject-verb agreement or verb tense, or you’ll see some run-on sentences or fragments. That is, if there are any errors at all. In both “improving sentences” and […]

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Lucas Fink

SAT Writing Question Types

SAT Writing: Aside from the essay… There are three scored writing sections on the SAT, one of which is the essay. Of course, the essay question (link to “The SAT Essay Prompt”) is something worth picking apart on it’s own, so we won’t worry about it here. Instead, let’s look at the types of questions […]

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Lucas Fink

SAT Improving Paragraphs: Answers and Explanations

Let’s look at the answers to those improving paragraphs questions.  Explanation 1 The problem: There’s a redundancy issue here. “In general” and “for the most part” mean the same thing, so using them both in a sentence—especially right next to each other—is awkward and totally unnecessary. Whenever possible, the SAT prefers shorter, clearer ways of […]

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Lucas Fink

SAT Improving Paragraphs Practice Questions

Here’s some practice with SAT improving paragraphs questions. Remember not to spend too much time reading the passage—you only need to get the gist of it. After you skim it, use the questions to guide you through the reading passage to the pieces you should be focusing on. Remember to watch for common SAT grammar […]

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Lucas Fink

The Passive Voice in SAT Writing

One of the errors that SAT writing multiple choice questions check for can be a little controversial because they’re not always exactly wrong. It’s actually a bit subjective. Here are a couple sentences with pretty much the exact same meaning. Are either of them incorrect? 1. My wig was stolen! 2. Somebody stole my wig! The […]

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Lucas Fink

The Best Method for SAT Improving Paragraphs Questions

Somewhere between the second and seventh sections of your SAT, you’re going to get a 25 minute writing multiple choice section. There will only be one of these (not counting the experimental section, which might be reading, math, or writing and is unscored); the other two writing sections are the essay—section 1—and a ten-minute improving […]

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Lucas Fink

Introductory Phrase Problems in SAT Writing Multiple Choice

Caused by a fatal error in design, the airship S.S. Doanblowup met its tragic end in 1915 in a sudden, ironic explosion. If you saw a sentence like this in the SAT writing multiple choice, you’d definitely want to make a correction (or in the case of Identifying Error questions, point out the problem). If […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Subject-Verb Agreement Quiz

Before you start, you may want to read the Writing Essentials Subject-Verb Agreement post. If you feel you ‘got it’, then have a go at these five questions. They are not easy, so good luck!   1. The number of Americans living in rural areas have decreased (A) to unprecedented levels, with (B)most farmers saying that their days (C)in […]

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Chris Lele

Common SAT Writing Error: Illogical Comparisons

One of the sneakiest question types on the SAT Writing section is when two things or people are being illogically compared. I always tell students to remember that you can only compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges. Let’s see if you can spot the illogical comparisons below: She enjoyed Haydn’s symphonies more than […]

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