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Category: SAT Reading Section

Lucas Fink

How to Study SAT Critical Reading

  A Quick Anecdote First, I should mention that this story is a bit tweaked for dramatic effect (read: not completely true), but the main point of the story is untainted by the details I’m adding. A few years ago, I was working with class of around ten SAT students through a difficult reading comprehension passage […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Sentence Completions – Dual Blanks

Now let’s try an actual two-blank SAT question so you can apply some of tricks above. The mayor’s self-serving excuses proved to have a(n) ________ effect on her career—she even ________ some of her staunchest advocates restorative . . heartened negative . . misaligned palliative . . sidelined deleterious . . alienated far-reaching . . […]

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Kristin Fracchia

Best Strategies for SAT Reading Comprehension

Below you’ll find a list of the absolute best SAT Reading tips out there to help you crush the new SAT, starting with our top 5 strategies for the test. Keep reading on for our advice on how to avoid common wrong answers on the SAT, special tips for the vocabulary in context questions, and finally how to use the varying difficulty level of SAT reading passages to your advantage. Consider this your COMPLETE GUIDE to SAT Reading success!

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Chris Lele

SAT Reading Comprehension – Parallel Reasoning

A really difficult type of question on the SAT has you take a scenario discussed in the passage and choose which of five hypothetical scenarios it is closest to. As you probably guessed, these five hypothetical scenarios make up the five answer choices. The passage below is already quite tricky, and the question below it […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Reading Comprehension – The Dual Passage

So here’s the skinny: there will always be two sets of dual passages, one short (35-30 lines total) and one medium to very long (60-90 lines). What exactly is a dual passage? Well, just as its name implies it is a set of two passages written on a similar topic. The passages usually do not […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Critical Reading – Vocabulary In Context

A very common question on the reading passages is the vocabulary-in-context question. Students also tend to make a very common error on these question types: matching up the answer choice with the words in quotation marks. Let me show you how this works. As it appears in the passage, the word “heralded” most nearly means […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Critical Reading – Advanced Strategies for Dual Blanks

For the last two sentence completions of each critical reading section, one of them is almost bound to be a two-blank Sentence Completion (and sometimes both are). While the general strategy for approaching these tough dual blankers is similar to what you’d use dealing with easy and medium two-blank Sentence Completions, there is some more […]

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Chris Lele

Common SAT Critical Reading Traps

The Traps 1. Extreme Language Often the SAT will make an answer that could debatably be correct by adding a word such as “never”, “always”, or simply, “no”. Remember, the correct answer has to be back up by the text in the answer. But an extreme answer is one that usually doesn’t have text to […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Vocab Friday – SAT Top 5 Vocabulary For Reading Comprehension

When people think of SAT vocabulary, they typically think of SAT Sentence Completions—you know, those fill-in-the-blank questions. True, most of the vocabulary you see on the SAT will be in that section. However, you shouldn’t forget that both the reading passages and the questions/answers following the passages are filled with vocabulary. The SAT tends to […]

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Kevin Rocci

How Hard is SAT Reading?

Reading! How hard could it be, right? We are talking about the SAT, though, and we know that this test likes to make things really hard. But the answer to “How hard is SAT reading?” depends a lot on you, the reader. Are you comfortable reading and analyzing fiction and nonfiction passages? Do you read […]

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