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Category: SAT Geometry

Lucas Fink

3D Geometric Objects in SAT Math

Quick: how do you find the volume of a cylinder? Do you know the formula? The SAT will give it to you at the beginning of each math section, along with some other geometric facts, but you should know them anyway. At least, you should be familiar with how you get those formulas.   Start […]

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Lucas Fink

SAT Graphs

Among the math skills that the SAT tests, reading data from tables or graphs is one of the more straightforward tasks. But there are a number of simple mistakes that might make you miss out on points if you’re not careful. The best way to avoid those totally avoidable slip-ups is to train yourself to […]

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Lucas Fink

SAT Geometry: Angle Diagram Questions

There will be a number of times on your SAT when you’ll be asked to find the measurement of an angle or angles, but you’ll be given a picture with only a bit of information on it. In these questions, the SAT makers are testing you on your ability to move information around a figure. […]

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Lucas Fink

Geometry Formulas for SAT Math

The makers of the SAT, believe it or not, are not out to get you. They do play tricks and try to lure you in with some wrong answers, and that feels devious at times, but you have just about everything you need to answer the questions in front of you on the SAT. They […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Math Basics – Triangles

What you need to know about triangles on the SAT is nowhere near as much as you probably learned in high school. Remember law of cosines? Exactly, most people do not. But the law of cosines, and just about every thing else from trigonometry, is not tested on the SAT. Ahh…I think I just heard […]

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Chris Lele

SAT Geometry Strategy: Plugging in Numbers

A great strategy on the SAT is plugging  in our own numbers. Many students forget this and instead try to set up ugly algebraic equations (while some have a knack for this, for the rest of us it is easier to think in 1, 2, 3, then in x, y, z). Other times students think […]

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