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Free GRE Practice Test With Answers and Explanations

Magoosh is excited to offer you a free GRE practice test with video answers and explanations. If you’re thinking about taking the GRE or want to see how effective your GRE test prep has been (or how long to study for the GRE!), pinpoint your strengths and weaknesses with this quiz!

Magoosh GRE Practice Test

Free GRE Practice Test by Magoosh

  • Quantitative Reasoning
  • Verbal Reasoning
 3%

Question 1 of 40

Quantitative Reasoning

1. Choose the correct statement. 
Circle A has radius x
Circle B has diameter 2x

Question 1 of 40

Question 2 of 40

2. Choose the correct statement.  
w + x + y = 21

Question 2 of 40

Question 3 of 40

3. Choose the correct statement.  
A number, x, is randomly selected from the integers from 42 to 92 inclusive.

Question 3 of 40

Question 4 of 40

4. Choose the correct statement. 
The sales tax at a certain store is 15 percent. The total price of an item, including sales tax, is $45.

Question 4 of 40

Question 5 of 40

5. Choose the correct statement. 
3 < |y| < 7

Question 5 of 40

Question 6 of 40

6. Choose the correct statement.  
When Car S covered a distance of D on a track, it covered 25% more distance than Car T had covered on the same track.

Question 6 of 40

Question 7 of 40

7. Choose the correct statement.  
Events A and B are independent.
The probability that events A and B both occur is 0.6

Question 7 of 40

Question 8 of 40

8. Choose the correct statement.  
A certain company has 200 employees, all of whom are either programmers or marketers. Among these, 20% of the programmers own pets, and 23% of the marketers own pets.

Question 8 of 40

Question 9 of 40

9. Choose the option that best answers the question.
If ak – b = c – dk, then k =

Question 9 of 40

Question 10 of 40

10. Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.
In a certain sequence of numbers, each term after the first is found by adding 1 to the previous term and then doubling this sum. If the third term is 18, which of the following numbers are in the sequence?

Indicated all such numbers.

Question 10 of 40

Question 11 of 40

11. Choose the option that best answers the question.
What is the value of w in terms of x and y?

Note: Figure not drawn to scale

Question 11 of 40

Question 12 of 40

12. Choose the option that best answers the question.

The graph above shows the total sales, in millions of dollars, for three companies, A & B & C, in a particular sector for the years 1998 through 2007 inclusive. Assume these companies are the only three companies active in this particular sector. Companies A & B existed since the 1980s, although only data from 1998 is shown. Company C's first year in existence was 2000.

Company C was responsible for approximately what percent of total sales in the sector in 2007?

Question 12 of 40

Question 13 of 40

13. Choose the option that best answers the question.

The graph above shows the total sales, in millions of dollars, for three companies, A & B & C, in a particular sector for the years 1998 through 2007 inclusive. Assume these companies are the only three companies active in this particular sector. Companies A & B existed since the 1980s, although only data from 1998 is shown. Company C's first year in existence was 2000.

From 2002 to 2003, Company C had what percentage increase in its total sales?

Improve your GRE score with Magoosh.

Question 13 of 40

Question 14 of 40

14. Choose the option that best answers the question.

The graph above shows the total sales, in millions of dollars, for three companies, A & B & C, in a particular sector for the years 1998 through 2007 inclusive. Assume these companies are the only three companies active in this particular sector. Companies A & B existed since the 1980s, although only data from 1998 is shown. Company C's first year in existence was 2000.

Total sales, by all companies in the sector, increased by approximately what percent from 1998 to 2007?

Question 14 of 40

Question 15 of 40

15. Choose the option that best answers the question.
The points A(0, 0), B(0, 4a – 5) and C(2a + 1, 2a + 6) form a triangle. If Angle ABC = 90, what is the area of triangle ABC?

Question 15 of 40

Question 16 of 40

16. Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.
For which values of x is

Indicate all possible values of x.

Question 16 of 40

Question 17 of 40

17. Choose the option that best answers the question.
 
Q = x3 − x

Given that x is a positive integer such that x ≥ 75, which of the following is the remainder when Q is divided by 6?

Question 17 of 40

Question 18 of 40

18. Choose the option that best answers the question.
The hypotenuse of a right triangle is 16 ft longer than the length of the shorter leg. If the area of this triangle is exactly 120 ft2, what is the length of the hypotenuse in feet?

Question 18 of 40

Question 19 of 40

19. Enter the answer in the blank.
When the decimal point of positive number N is moved 2 places to the left, the result is equal to 6/(N–1). What is the value of N?

Question 19 of 40

Question 20 of 40

20. Choose the option that best answers the question.
Paracelsus University has two kinds of professors: academic professors and professional professors. At Paracelsus University, 60% of the professors are academic professors, and 70% of the professors are tenured. If 90% of the professors at Paracelsus University are academic professors or tenured or both, then what percent of the professional professors there are tenured?

Question 20 of 40

Question 21 of 40

Verbal Reasoning

21. Choose the option that best answers the question.
Some of today’s tech CEO’s are spoken of in the press and on social media in such ________ tones that they have taken on a nearly messianic quality, entrepreneurs following their every move like a gaggle of disciples.

Question 21 of 40

Question 22 of 40

22. Choose the option that best answers the question.
Since memories of recent events tend to be far more accessible, during a prolonged economic upswing investors often ________ plausible scenarios forecasting a recession.

Question 22 of 40

Question 23 of 40

23. In Don Giovanni, what is perhaps Mozart’s best-known opera, there exist two distinct endings, a phenomenon not entirely unknown during the composer’s time, but one that invites the obvious question: Why did Mozart decide to include alternate endings for Don Giovanni when he did not do the same with his other famous operas, Die Zauberflöte and Le Nozze di Figaro. Another question, and one not so obvious, is: Why was Mozart himself uncertain as to which of the two endings to choose, as is evidenced in his correspondence with Lorenzo Da Ponte, the opera’s librettist?

A common answer is to treat both these questions as one: Mozart was uncertain as to which ending to provide, so he wrote both endings. Such a reply ignores an important consideration: Why did Mozart decide to provide these specific endings? Libard provides a reasonable answer: The traditional ending—in the sense that it is the one that was popular during the composer’s day and continues to be so today—is clearly more palatable for audiences. The hero, Don Giovanni, is chided for his libertine ways and then the cast appears in tutti, bellowing a merry chorus as the curtain falls. The audience is left having a light dose of entertainment, which, after all, was the aim of many of the operas of Mozart’s time. Fine, but then what of the tragic ending? Libard—trading the sensible for the pat—offers little more than that such an ending reflects the political climate of the day.

This alternate ending—Don Giovanni is suddenly cast down to Hell, and instead of being redeemed, the hero emerges from the underworld chastened, and the curtain falls—was interpreted by the critics of the day as heavy-handed didacticism. While such a view is not entirely without merit—Mozart ultimately aimed to impart some lesson for his incorrigible Lothario—it still leaves the question unanswered as to why two endings and what exactly did Mozart aim to communicate that could not be housed in a traditional ending.

One answer offered recently by musicologist Gustavo Lucien is that Mozart balked at including a traditional ending, feeling that it was incongruous with the serious tone of most of the opera. Indeed, Don Giovanni falls more under the rubric of opera serie than opera buffo, the latter typically featuring light endings in which the entire cast sings in an upbeat, major key. Da Ponte, however, insisted that forthwith casting Don Giovanni to Hell, and offering him scant opportunity for redemption, would likely leave the audience feeling ambivalent. Such an ending would also suggest that the librettist had been unable to think of a tidy resolution. Da Ponte, then, was not so much against a tragic ending as he was an abrupt tragic ending. Perhaps even Mozart was unsure of what to do with Don Giovanni once he was in Hell and may have even been working out a different ending, using the light ending as a stopgap till he achieved such an aim. In that case the fate of Don Giovanni can best be answered by the fact that Mozart—through debts, ill-health, and the composer’s obligation to compose works for his patrons—was unable to return to a work he had tabled.

In the context in which it is used, “tabled” most nearly means

Question 23 of 40

Question 24 of 40

24. In Don Giovanni, what is perhaps Mozart’s best-known opera, there exist two distinct endings, a phenomenon not entirely unknown during the composer’s time, but one that invites the obvious question: Why did Mozart decide to include alternate endings for Don Giovanni when he did not do the same with his other famous operas, Die Zauberflöte and Le Nozze di Figaro. Another question, and one not so obvious, is: Why was Mozart himself uncertain as to which of the two endings to choose, as is evidenced in his correspondence with Lorenzo Da Ponte, the opera’s librettist?

A common answer is to treat both these questions as one: Mozart was uncertain as to which ending to provide, so he wrote both endings. Such a reply ignores an important consideration: Why did Mozart decide to provide these specific endings? Libard provides a reasonable answer: The traditional ending—in the sense that it is the one that was popular during the composer’s day and continues to be so today—is clearly more palatable for audiences. The hero, Don Giovanni, is chided for his libertine ways and then the cast appears in tutti, bellowing a merry chorus as the curtain falls. The audience is left having a light dose of entertainment, which, after all, was the aim of many of the operas of Mozart’s time. Fine, but then what of the tragic ending? Libard—trading the sensible for the pat—offers little more than that such an ending reflects the political climate of the day.

This alternate ending—Don Giovanni is suddenly cast down to Hell, and instead of being redeemed, the hero emerges from the underworld chastened, and the curtain falls—was interpreted by the critics of the day as heavy-handed didacticism. While such a view is not entirely without merit—Mozart ultimately aimed to impart some lesson for his incorrigible Lothario—it still leaves the question unanswered as to why two endings and what exactly did Mozart aim to communicate that could not be housed in a traditional ending.

One answer offered recently by musicologist Gustavo Lucien is that Mozart balked at including a traditional ending, feeling that it was incongruous with the serious tone of most of the opera. Indeed, Don Giovanni falls more under the rubric of opera serie than opera buffo, the latter typically featuring light endings in which the entire cast sings in an upbeat, major key. Da Ponte, however, insisted that forthwith casting Don Giovanni to Hell, and offering him scant opportunity for redemption, would likely leave the audience feeling ambivalent. Such an ending would also suggest that the librettist had been unable to think of a tidy resolution. Da Ponte, then, was not so much against a tragic ending as he was an abrupt tragic ending. Perhaps even Mozart was unsure of what to do with Don Giovanni once he was in Hell and may have even been working out a different ending, using the light ending as a stopgap till he achieved such an aim. In that case the fate of Don Giovanni can best be answered by the fact that Mozart—through debts, ill-health, and the composer’s obligation to compose works for his patrons—was unable to return to a work he had tabled.

The author of the passage would take exception to all of the following statements regarding Libard’s response to the existence of dual endings to Don Giovanni EXCEPT?

Question 24 of 40

Question 25 of 40

25. In Don Giovanni, what is perhaps Mozart’s best-known opera, there exist two distinct endings, a phenomenon not entirely unknown during the composer’s time, but one that invites the obvious question: Why did Mozart decide to include alternate endings for Don Giovanni when he did not do the same with his other famous operas, Die Zauberflöte and Le Nozze di Figaro. Another question, and one not so obvious, is: Why was Mozart himself uncertain as to which of the two endings to choose, as is evidenced in his correspondence with Lorenzo Da Ponte, the opera’s librettist?

A common answer is to treat both these questions as one: Mozart was uncertain as to which ending to provide, so he wrote both endings. Such a reply ignores an important consideration: Why did Mozart decide to provide these specific endings? Libard provides a reasonable answer: The traditional ending—in the sense that it is the one that was popular during the composer’s day and continues to be so today—is clearly more palatable for audiences. The hero, Don Giovanni, is chided for his libertine ways and then the cast appears in tutti, bellowing a merry chorus as the curtain falls. The audience is left having a light dose of entertainment, which, after all, was the aim of many of the operas of Mozart’s time. Fine, but then what of the tragic ending? Libard—trading the sensible for the pat—offers little more than that such an ending reflects the political climate of the day.

This alternate ending—Don Giovanni is suddenly cast down to Hell, and instead of being redeemed, the hero emerges from the underworld chastened, and the curtain falls—was interpreted by the critics of the day as heavy-handed didacticism. While such a view is not entirely without merit—Mozart ultimately aimed to impart some lesson for his incorrigible Lothario—it still leaves the question unanswered as to why two endings and what exactly did Mozart aim to communicate that could not be housed in a traditional ending.

One answer offered recently by musicologist Gustavo Lucien is that Mozart balked at including a traditional ending, feeling that it was incongruous with the serious tone of most of the opera. Indeed, Don Giovanni falls more under the rubric of opera serie than opera buffo, the latter typically featuring light endings in which the entire cast sings in an upbeat, major key. Da Ponte, however, insisted that forthwith casting Don Giovanni to Hell, and offering him scant opportunity for redemption, would likely leave the audience feeling ambivalent. Such an ending would also suggest that the librettist had been unable to think of a tidy resolution. Da Ponte, then, was not so much against a tragic ending as he was an abrupt tragic ending. Perhaps even Mozart was unsure of what to do with Don Giovanni once he was in Hell and may have even been working out a different ending, using the light ending as a stopgap till he achieved such an aim. In that case the fate of Don Giovanni can best be answered by the fact that Mozart—through debts, ill-health, and the composer’s obligation to compose works for his patrons—was unable to return to a work he had tabled.

According to the passage, Mozart’s use of a tragic ending allowed him to accomplish which of the following? Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.

Question 25 of 40

Question 26 of 40

26. In Don Giovanni, what is perhaps Mozart’s best-known opera, there exist two distinct endings, a phenomenon not entirely unknown during the composer’s time, but one that invites the obvious question: Why did Mozart decide to include alternate endings for Don Giovanni when he did not do the same with his other famous operas, Die Zauberflöte and Le Nozze di Figaro. Another question, and one not so obvious, is: Why was Mozart himself uncertain as to which of the two endings to choose, as is evidenced in his correspondence with Lorenzo Da Ponte, the opera’s librettist?

A common answer is to treat both these questions as one: Mozart was uncertain as to which ending to provide, so he wrote both endings. Such a reply ignores an important consideration: Why did Mozart decide to provide these specific endings? Libard provides a reasonable answer: The traditional ending—in the sense that it is the one that was popular during the composer’s day and continues to be so today—is clearly more palatable for audiences. The hero, Don Giovanni, is chided for his libertine ways and then the cast appears in tutti, bellowing a merry chorus as the curtain falls. The audience is left having a light dose of entertainment, which, after all, was the aim of many of the operas of Mozart’s time. Fine, but then what of the tragic ending? Libard—trading the sensible for the pat—offers little more than that such an ending reflects the political climate of the day.

This alternate ending—Don Giovanni is suddenly cast down to Hell, and instead of being redeemed, the hero emerges from the underworld chastened, and the curtain falls—was interpreted by the critics of the day as heavy-handed didacticism. While such a view is not entirely without merit—Mozart ultimately aimed to impart some lesson for his incorrigible Lothario—it still leaves the question unanswered as to why two endings and what exactly did Mozart aim to communicate that could not be housed in a traditional ending.

One answer offered recently by musicologist Gustavo Lucien is that Mozart balked at including a traditional ending, feeling that it was incongruous with the serious tone of most of the opera. Indeed, Don Giovanni falls more under the rubric of opera serie than opera buffo, the latter typically featuring light endings in which the entire cast sings in an upbeat, major key. Da Ponte, however, insisted that forthwith casting Don Giovanni to Hell, and offering him scant opportunity for redemption, would likely leave the audience feeling ambivalent. Such an ending would also suggest that the librettist had been unable to think of a tidy resolution. Da Ponte, then, was not so much against a tragic ending as he was an abrupt tragic ending.

Perhaps even Mozart was unsure of what to do with Don Giovanni once he was in Hell and may have even been working out a different ending, using the light ending as a stopgap till he achieved such an aim. In that case the fate of Don Giovanni can best be answered by the fact that Mozart—through debts, ill-health, and the composer’s obligation to compose works for his patrons—was unable to return to a work he had tabled.

Select the sentence that describes an explanation of Mozart’s contemporaries regarding the composer’s objective in choosing a tragic ending.

Question 26 of 40

Question 27 of 40

27. Select exactly two answer choices that best complete the sentence and produce sentences that are alike in meaning.
The proliferation of cell phones with multi-pixel digital cameras has enabled even the most ________ photographers amongst us to become citizen journalists.

Question 27 of 40

Question 28 of 40

28. Select exactly two answer choices that best complete the sentence and produce sentences that are alike in meaning.
Ignoring the crowd’s entreaties for _______, the judge remained implacable, meting out a punishment that was as harsh as it was arbitrary.

Question 28 of 40

Question 29 of 40

29. Select exactly two answer choices that best complete the sentence and produce sentences that are alike in meaning.
Imperiled by excessive logging activity, the Canadian snow goose is unusually sensitive to any encroachments into its territory, displaying a(n) ______________ rare amongst waterfowl.

Question 29 of 40

Question 30 of 40

30. Select exactly two answer choices that best complete the sentence and produce sentences that are alike in meaning.
Academics, when locking rhetorical horns, can toss off the most pointed barbs by deploying nothing more than an understated phrase, so it should come as no surprise that they are also prone to seeing ___________ where none exist.

Question 30 of 40

Question 31 of 40

31. While antibiotics have done inestimable good to humankind over the last seventy years, there are several drawbacks to using antibiotics that, until recently, have been overlooked. The human microbiome, which consists of the trillions of bacteria that reside in each person’s body, is essential to good health. Specifically, the body contains and requires both “good” and “bad” bacteria. It is when the proper equilibrium between the “good” bacteria and the “bad” bacteria is disrupted that a number of health issues can emerge. Nonetheless, antibiotics indiscriminately kill both the “good” and the “bad” bacteria, so each course of antibiotics should be followed by a treatment that ___________________________________.

Which of the following most logically completes the argument above?

Question 31 of 40

Question 32 of 40

32. Once American men returned from the WWII battlefields, they quickly displaced the women who had temporarily filled jobs otherwise reserved for men. With many women reverting to their domestic role, the dramatic increase in birth rate is perhaps not too surprising. Yet, such factors alone cannot explain the increase in the number of births from 1946-1951. Murray suggests that both women and men’s perspectives changed, mostly because of America’s success in the war, leading to rapid population growth. However, this position ignores the many middle- and lower-middle class women who continued working in factories and who contributed to the dramatic surge in population. Regarding this subset, the more plausible view is that couples were more likely to conceive based on the fact that they considered themselves part of a dual-income household—if necessary, the woman of the home could work.

As used in the final sentence, “plausible” most nearly means

Question 32 of 40

Question 33 of 40

33. Once American men returned from the WWII battlefields, they quickly displaced the women who had temporarily filled jobs otherwise reserved for men. With many women reverting to their domestic role, the dramatic increase in birth rate is perhaps not too surprising. Yet, such factors alone cannot explain the increase in the number of births from 1946-1951. Murray suggests that both women and men’s perspectives changed, mostly because of America’s success in the war, leading to rapid population growth. However, this position ignores the many middle- and lower-middle class women who continued working in factories and who contributed to the dramatic surge in population. Regarding this subset, the more plausible view is that couples were more likely to conceive based on the fact that they considered themselves part of a dual-income household—if necessary, the woman of the home could work.

The passage implies that the main shortcoming in Murray’s view is that it

Question 33 of 40

Question 34 of 40

34. For much of the 20th century, paleontologists theorized that dinosaurs, like reptiles, were ectothermic, their body temperature regulated externally. These scientists, however, based their conclusions on faulty reasoning, claiming that scaly skin was common to all ectotherms (birds, which are ectothermic, do not have scaly skin) and that the dinosaur’s size could account for ectothermy (some adult dinosaurs weighed as little as ten pounds). Supplanting this theory is an entirely new line of thought: dinosaurs were actually mesothermic, neither warm- nor cold-blooded. By taking this middle ground, some paleontologists maintain that dinosaurs were faster than a similar-sized reptile yet did not require as much food as a similar-sized mammal. To substantiate this theory, paleontologists intend to study how birds, the dinosaur’s closest extant relative, might have at one time been mesothermic.

The two parts in parentheses serve to do which of the following?

Question 34 of 40

Question 35 of 40

35. For much of the 20th century, paleontologists theorized that dinosaurs, like reptiles, were ectothermic, their body temperature regulated externally. These scientists, however, based their conclusions on faulty reasoning, claiming that scaly skin was common to all ectotherms (birds, which are ectothermic, do not have scaly skin) and that the dinosaur’s size could account for ectothermy (some adult dinosaurs weighed as little as ten pounds). Supplanting this theory is an entirely new line of thought: dinosaurs were actually mesothermic, neither warm- nor cold-blooded. By taking this middle ground, some paleontologists maintain that dinosaurs were faster than a similar-sized reptile yet did not require as much food as a similar-sized mammal. To substantiate this theory, paleontologists intend to study how birds, the dinosaur’s closest extant relative, might have at one time been mesothermic.

Based on the information in the passage, it can be inferred that which of the following is a possible benefit conferred by mesothermy?

Question 35 of 40

Question 36 of 40

36. Select two answers, one choice for each blank.
There is a rising consensus amongst immunologists that the observed rise in allergies in the general population can be attributed to (i) ____________ exposure to everyday germs. Known as the hygiene hypothesis, this counterintuitive idea could have far reaching implications—for one, we may now have to be more (ii)____________ those paternal prescriptions to scrub our children’s hands at every opportunity.

Question 36 of 40

Question 37 of 40

37. Select two answers, one choice for each blank.
The latest biography on J. R. Oppenheimer, in attempting to dispel the pervasive notion that he was a(n) (i) ____________, only (ii) ____________ such a view: seemingly every one of Oppenheimer’s quirks is related with gleeful fondness.

Question 37 of 40

Question 38 of 40

38. Select three answers, one choice for each blank.
According to Lackmuller’s latest screed, published under the title, Why We Can’t Win at Their Game, special interest groups not nominally tied to ecological concerns have become so (i) ___________ the process of environmental policymaking that those groups who actually aim to ensure that corporate profit does not trump environmental health have been effectively (ii) __________. Lackmuller’s contention, however, is (iii) __________ in that it fails to account for the signal achievements environmental groups have effected over the last 20 years—often to the chagrin of big business.

Question 38 of 40

Question 39 of 40

39. Select three answers, one choice for each blank.
As spurious sightings of imaginary creatures that have captured the popular mind (i) ______________, however (ii) ________________ a story may be, once it has been circulated enough times, it will gather a patina of (iii) ______________.

Question 39 of 40

Question 40 of 40

40. Select three answers, one choice for each blank.
There are two skeins to Darwin’s thought that are, at first blush, (i) _________: Darwin believed that a gradual change in the environment brought about commensurately gradual changes to organisms (descent by modification), and therefore that man was no different from any other species; yet, though he opposed the catastrophist school of thought, which posited that animals changed in the face of massive calamity—either perishing or adapting—Darwin also (ii) __________ humankind in the sudden disappearance of animals, thereby implying that man indeed was (iii) _________ all other species (he caused the extinction of other species) and such extinctions were the result of a massive calamity—man.

Question 40 of 40


 

Please note that the formatting of several Verbal Reasoning questions will be slightly different than what you will see on test day. However, the content of the test is reflective of the GRE.

GRE Practice Test Quant and Verbal - magoosh

This Full-Length GRE Practice Test Includes

What can you expect to see in this GRE free practice test? Our GRE test-prep experts–including Chris Lele and Rachel Kapelke-Dale, along with members of our awesome GRE tutor team–have prepared GRE practice test questions for you. The test includes the following sections:

Quantitative Reasoning (20 questions)

GRE math practice test questions might throw you off. For a lot of students, the GRE Quantitative Reasoning section presents question types they’ve never seen before. However, with careful practice, you can master these! On test day, expect to see:

  • Multiple choice questions with one answer choice
  • gre multiple choice problem - magoosh

  • Multiple choice questions with multiple answer choices. These could be “all that apply” or “exactly X correct answer choices” (such as “exactly three correct answer choices.”) Be sure to read directions carefully!
  • gre multiple select problem - magoosh

  • Type-in answers (numeric entry)
  • gre numeric entry problem - magoosh

  • Quantitative comparisons. These are the trickiest question types for many test-takers but becoming familiar with them helps a lot. You do not solve the problems given in these questions. Instead, you review two columns (which can contain anything from numbers to equations). Then, you decide whether the information in Column A is bigger, the information in Column B is bigger, the two quantities are equal, or if it cannot be determined from the information given.
    gre quantitative comparison problem - magoosh

If the GRE quantitative practice test makes you nervous, you’re not alone. A lot of test-takers won’t have studied math since high school or college. That’s OK! Just make sure to brush up on all of the topics you’ll see. If you’re unsure of where to begin, taking a GRE online practice test is a great way to figure out areas to focus on.

You can expect to see the following subjects covered on the GRE.

GRE Quant ConceptPercentage frequency on the test
Word problems35.5%
Ratios, percents, and fractions23.9%
Algebra22.8%
Data interpretation20%
Integer properties and arithmetic16.7%
Two-dimensional geometry15%
Statistics14.4%
Powers and roots7.8%
Inequalities6.1%
Probability and combinatronics5.6%
Coordinate geometry4.4%
Three dimensional geometry2.2%
Sequences1.7%
Functions1.1%

Verbal Reasoning (14 questions)

The GRE Verbal practice test contains many question types that you’ll see on the official exam. In this section, you’ll encounter general GRE practice questions that test your reading comprehension and critical reading skills. These include:

  • Text Completion. These are questions with blanks that you select the answers to. You’ll see one or two TCs with single blanks, two to three with double blanks, and one to two with triple blanks. For questions with more than one blank, you must fill in the right answer everywhere to get the point.
  • gre text completion problem - magoosh

  • Reading Comprehension. These questions come with passages, which vary from fewer than 20 lines (short) to over 40 lines (long). They ask about your understanding of the text.
  • gre reading comprehension problem - magoosh

  • Critical Reasoning. Technically a subset of Reading Comprehension questions, CR questions ask you to make logical connections between pieces of information in a short passage.
  • gre critical reasoning problem - magoosh

  • Sentence Equivalence questions. SE questions ask you to select words that complete a given sentence—and that produce the same meaning. If your vocabulary is strong (and you can make it stronger with good preparation), these questions go quickly!
    gre sentence equivalence problem - magoosh

GRE Practice Test Answers and Explanations - magoosh

GRE Practice Test Answers and Explanations

What should you do after you finish Magoosh’s free GRE practice test? Check out the answers and explanations, of course!

In these links, you’ll find video and text descriptions of the right answers, as well as explanations for why the right answer is correct (and why other answers are wrong).

After you’ve finished taking the GRE practice test online, it’s vital to review all of your answers—even the right ones. A lot of students don’t take the time to do this, but that’s a huge mistake! You may have gotten a question right because you guessed. Or you may have gotten it right but been unsure about why it’s right. When a question testing that same material comes up on test day, you’ll miss it—unless you master the material during your prep, of course! A little time now can gain you lots of points later on.

Find GRE Practice Test - magoosh

Where to Find Official GRE Practice Tests

So you’ve reviewed the free online GRE practice test answers and explanations. Great job! However, for truly outstanding prep, you’ll want to take more practice GRE tests throughout your preparation. One a week is a great start. Where to look?

Remember that it’s a good idea to try multiple full-length practice tests for GRE test practice. To find them…

As you practice your test preparation skills with a mock test (or several mock tests!), check out the Magoosh blog for tips to help you master different subject areas with our study guides. We’ve covered everything from the most frequent GRE quant concepts to a comprehensive guide to Reading Comprehension questions for GRE verbal.

Finally, don’t forget to set goals! You can find out everything you need to know about GRE scores here. And Magoosh’s GRE prep can help you reach those goals once you’ve set them!

P.S. Ready to improve your GRE score? Get started today.

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