GRE Math Tips

GRE math tips aren't one size fits all—depending on your quantitative confidence, some will appeal to you more than others. For beginners, learn strategies such as how to avoid common mistakes and memorization tips for formulas. For advanced mathematicians, learn how to find solutions faster and how to solve the most complicated questions on the Quantitive Reasoning Measure.

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Most Popular GRE Math Tips

Practice Question Solve this question.  Allot yourself a strict 1.5 minute time limit. 1) In the figure, ABCD is a square, and all the dots are evenly spaced: each vertical or horizontal distance between two adjacent dots is 3 units.  Find the area of the shaded region. 60 72 81 96 120 An explanation will […]

Most Recent GRE Math Tips

Suppose you have been away from math for a while, perhaps since Algebra Two and the SAT in high school.  After these necessarily evils, you bid it a hasty farewell and gave it the bum’s rush from your entire life.  Now, several years later, you have completed a Baccalaureate degree in something, and wish to […]

The GRE math can be tricky but unlike the GMAT, in which questions can be fiendishly convoluted, the GRE still rewards fundamentals. If you have a solid grounding in all of the fundamentals—that’s right, no weak areas but an across the board sturdy grasp of any concepts that can pop up test day—you have a […]

The GRE math sections each contain 20 questions. You are given 35 minutes for each section, which works out to 1:45 seconds per question. Below are some helpful tips to help you wisely use these 35 minutes.   Go for the low-hanging fruit Each question in the GRE quantitative section is worth the same number […]

Learn the Fundamentals This may seem obvious – but you need to have a strong grasp of basics such as exponents, triangle properties, an integers before even attempting to take the test. But even a shaky grasp of the fundamentals can slow you down. Make sure you are confident with the basics. However, there is […]

I’m not actually a fan of formulas. Instead, I encourage students to think critically about how formulas are derived. That way, these students are able to have a stronger intuitive sense of the way the math behind the formula works. For instance, say you have a 30-60-90 triangle. Many students falter because they always mix […]