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Miller Analogies Test Advice

There is quite a bit of Miller Analogies Test advice available throughout the MAT blog. To help you get a feel for the resources available to you here, let’s dive into the easiest steps you can take to prepare for this exam:

MAT Test Materials

One of the biggest mistakes you can make in preparing for any exam is to skip over learning about the “structure” of the test. Each exam has its own patterns and idiosyncrasies that, if learned, will dramatically improve your score.

Start with the MAT Study Guide and read it from beginning to end. It’s a short read and it’s free. From there I would suggest purchasing an additional MAT study guide. Read about Kaplan and Barron’s—the two main guides for the MAT—and choose the one you like most. Or, since they are especially cheap, purchase both. These will provide you with numerous pre-made study lists, practice questions, and practice tests.

MAT Study Plans and approaches

We have come up with quite a few ways to approach the MAT, including some specific study plans depending on the time you have available. These can help you organize your studies so that you don’t waste a moment:

One Month MAT Study Schedule

One Week Miller Analogies Study Plan

How To Master The MAT

Can You Study for the MAT

Ten General Guidelines for the MAT

Bringing it all together

You could spend all your time studying the content or looking for ways to “leverage” the test structure in your favor. If you want to get the best score possible, you need to pursue both. You have to study the content, and you have to learn how to maneuver around the exam in a way that lets you best demonstrate your knowledge.

Read through the information suggested here, take notes on anything that appears important, and let those notes inform the rest of your studies. Come back to them at the beginning of each week and make sure your efforts are being spent on what will make the biggest difference.

We often take our study habits for granted, thinking there is no way to be “better” at it. But you need to be thoughtful in how you spend your time; be active. Always ask, “Is this working?” Try to find ways to test your approach because what works for one person does not work for everyone. We recommend flashcards constantly, but if you find these so boring that you don’t remember the words, it’s time to find something new. This is just one example, but the point is to always check for progress.

In addition, keep reading through the blog in your spare time. It will help you become an MAT expert!

About Bertrand

Bertrand is a remote tutor and a MAT blogger for Magoosh. He received a B.A. from Fairleigh Dickinson University and studied education theory at Rutgers Graduate School of Education. He has been studying and working in education since 2010. Born and raised in New Jersey, he now resides in Philadelphia. When he isn’t helping students study or writing blogs for Magoosh, he spends his time practicing mixed martial arts and reading as much as his schedule permits.

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