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MAT Score Conversion

The MAT is going to provide you with several pieces of information about your performance on the exam. The first will be a “scaled score.” This score converts your raw score—the number of questions you answered correctly—into a score between 200-600. Your scaled score will then be given a percentile rank you can use to compare yourself to both all test-takers and those in your specific major.

MAT score conversion: raw score to scaled score

While many, if not most students, want to know how their raw score converts to a scaled score (or vice versa), the test maker has not provided this information to the general public. However, there are some colleges that offer charts which we can assume are fairly reliable: MAT Score Conversion.

One thing to keep in mind is that the MAT does not expect you to answer that many questions correctly. In fact, to get an average score of 400, you can probably miss more than half of the questions. Answering 3/4 of the questions correctly would put you at about the 99th percentile! This is very different from other tests, like the GRE, where you need to answer nearly all the questions correctly to get a top score.

MAT score conversion: scaled score to score percentile

Again, the test maker has not provided an official conversion for this. Students who take the MAT do not all take the exact same version of the test. There are slight variations in the difficulty between versions. This means that two similar scores on the MAT might yield slightly different score percentiles depending on the version taken. This fact prevents Pearson from developing an authoritative conversion chart for score percentiles.

We have tried to put together something reasonable in the MAT score percentiles article (the resources are there as well). It should help students estimate the conversion. For students interested in reading more about scaled scores, see Pearson’s Candidate Information Booklet.

About Bertrand

Bertrand is a remote tutor and a MAT blogger for Magoosh. He received a B.A. from Fairleigh Dickinson University and studied education theory at Rutgers Graduate School of Education. He has been studying and working in education since 2010. Born and raised in New Jersey, he now resides in Philadelphia. When he isn’t helping students study or writing blogs for Magoosh, he spends his time practicing mixed martial arts and reading as much as his schedule permits.

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