Sign up for Early Access to Magoosh Miller Analogies!


How to master the Miller Analogies Test

There is a lot to do if you want to master the Miller Analogies Test. I would break “mastery” down into test format, question format, and content. These represent the total challenge presented by the MAT. Mastery requires a complete understanding of these challenges and the relevant strategies.

Test Format

A huge factor when taking an exam is the exam itself. How long is it? How many questions? Are you able to skip or guess without penalty? These details change how you approach the exam.

On the MAT, you will have 60 minutes to answer 120 questions. Each question is worth the same amount of points. You are allowed to skip questions and return to them later. There is no penalty for guessing; incorrect answers do not cost you points.

Given this information (which you should memorize), the goal is to maintain a pace that allows you to answer every question on the exam. That is the goal on any exam that does not penalize incorrect answers and allows skipping. From Day 1, practice MAT questions under realistic time constraints. Work to spend 30 seconds or less on each question.

Further, as you do practice tests, identify your weak subject areas. You should know exactly how adept you are in each subject: history, biology, etc. Knowing this allows you to make snap judgments about whether to tackle a question or skip it to save for the end.

Mastering this requires numerous practice tests with strict adherence to time constraints. Followed by constant analysis of your performance.

Question Format

You need to study the different analogical relationships. A complete list plus examples is featured in the official study guide, and we are working on an ongoing article for each.

In addition to knowing what the relationships are, you need good strategies for solving them. We cover the key strategy here. Others are to be found in the official study guide, and several more can be found in Kaplan and Barron’s MAT study guides.

Mastery in this area comes down to memorizing the relationships and strategies, and then relentlessly practicing those strategies on every practice question.


Frankly, there is no “mastering” MAT content. They can pull terms from any academic area. But you can get to a point where only truly obscure terms stump you. The amount of time necessary for this is different for everyone. Anyone looking to “master” this content should probably aim for 4+ months of study. I would suggest purchasing and completing both Kaplan and Barron’s study guides and all three official practice exams. In addition, here are several useful blog articles:

Can you study for the MAT?

Ten General Guidelines

1 Week Study Plan

1 Month Study Plan

(A few general study ones from the GMAT)

Learning from practice

Understanding the GMAT

GMAT learning and memory

Try to absorb the principles behind these study approaches. There is a good chance you will have to synthesize them into something that works best for you, applying it consistently for 4 months or more. Happy studying!

About Bertrand

Bertrand is a remote tutor and a MAT blogger for Magoosh. He received a B.A. from Fairleigh Dickinson University and studied education theory at Rutgers Graduate School of Education. He has been studying and working in education since 2010. Born and raised in New Jersey, he now resides in Philadelphia. When he isn’t helping students study or writing blogs for Magoosh, he spends his time practicing mixed martial arts and reading as much as his schedule permits.

Leave a Reply

Magoosh blog comment policy: To create the best experience for our readers, we will approve and respond to comments that are relevant to the article, general enough to be helpful to other students, concise, and well-written! :) If your comment was not approved, it likely did not adhere to these guidelines. If you are a Premium Magoosh student and would like more personalized service, you can use the Help tab on the Magoosh dashboard. Thanks!