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Chris Lele

SAT Vocab Monday: Words Ending in ‘O’


There aren’t too many words in English that end in ‘o’, fewer of which are actually SAT words. But I have been able to lasso (notice that ‘o’) a few vocabulary words you might see test day.


From the Greek for glory, kudos isn’t pluralized (there is no such thing as a kudo!). Today, it has lost its grander connotation of glory and means simply praise or plaudits. When you do well on a test (let’s hope this applies to the SAT), your parents or teachers will likely offer you kudos, saying good job.


When we travel, we like to pick up little souvenirs or knick-knacks. But I’m not just talking about some cheesy shirt saying “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”; I’m talking about a bona fide curious item. Speaking of San Francisco, if you visit the Chinatown there you’ll be sure to find all sorts of little hard-to-find items.


If it’s the first time you trying something out, let’s say Scrabble, you’d be described as a tyro. If you are starting out with SAT prep and are just learning all the new words that the SAT has to throw at you, then you are a SAT vocabulary tyro. The opposite of a tyro is an expert.


From the Latin for ‘sin’ (pecca-) and the Spanish for ‘small’ (dillo-), a peccadillo is just that: a small sin. Not doing your homework for one night—as long as there is no test the next day—is a peccadillo. Not studying for an entire week is a pecca-grande (don’t worry, there’s no such word!).

About Chris Lele

Chris Lele is the GRE and SAT Curriculum Manager (and vocabulary wizard) at Magoosh Online Test Prep. In his time at Magoosh, he has inspired countless students across the globe, turning what is otherwise a daunting experience into an opportunity for learning, growth, and fun. Some of his students have even gone on to get near perfect scores. Chris is also very popular on the internet. His GRE channel on YouTube has over 8 million views.

You can read Chris's awesome blog posts on the Magoosh GRE blog and High School blog!

You can follow him on Twitter and Facebook!

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