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Emily Faison

How to get old ACT scores

Maybe you decided to apply to more colleges, after you already took the ACT and sent your scores. Maybe you need a score report for a scholarship application. Or maybe you can’t remember whether you got a 28 or 29, or you’re just plain curious. For whatever reason, you need to check out your old ACT scores.

But wait. How exactly do you go about finding an old ACT score report? Have no clue what your ACT username is? Or maybe you don’t remember when you took the test?

It turns out, finding your old ACT scores is a breeze!


Logging In

First things first, you do need your user ID and password that you used when you registered for the ACT. Luckily, even if you don’t remember your login info, the ACT will help you find your user ID and reset your password, as long as you have the email address associated with your account. Once you get your user ID and password all settled, you can log in.

Locating Scores

After you log in, you’ll see Your Test Dates And Scores in the menu on the lefthand sidebar. After you click on that tab, you’ll be able to see a list of all the exams you registered for, whether you cancelled registration, or actually took the test. You’ll also see whether or not you took the writing portion of the test, which might help jog your memory if you’re looking for the score of a particular date you took the ACT.

    Fun Fact: You can find all ACT scores online for tests taken after October 1, 1966.

Once you determine which test date you’re interested in, click on the date. The ACT website will prompt you to enter your password in a second time, for extra security. Now you’re in!

Now that you’re logged into the score section, you can check out a fairly detailed report about your performance on the ACT. As you look over your scores, make sure to make a mental note of which test dates you want to send the scores of. Of course you’ll be able to see your composite score (that’s the one you tell everyone and brag about), but you can also see the writing score if you wrote the optional essay, subscores, and subject area scores.
Understanding your subscores can be pretty helpful if you’re applying to specific college program. Some programs or grants might want to know how well you did on a subject that matters to them. You’ll usually still need a great overall score, but if your math score is exceptionally high, that can be a big boost if you’re applying for a math-related major or scholarship. But, if you want those scholarships, colleges, or anyone else to view your scores, you’ll have to send them.

Sending Reports

If you head back to that lefthand sidebar, you’ll see a tab called Send Your Scores. Once you click, you’ll see your score reports organized by date. Unfortunately, the only free reports you can send are the ones included in your registration, way back when you took the ACT. Now, you’ll have to pay to send score reports. If you took the ACT after September 2013, it’s only $12 per test date and per report (so, you can only pick one test date to send a report of…unless you want to pay double!).
If you took the test before September 2013, then your score is archived…which just means it isn’t in the ACT’s active file. Retrieving archived scores can take a day or two longer, and currently costs $34 ($22 archive fee + $12 report).
To send your old ACT score, you’ll need the code for the school that you want to receive your scores. The ACT score page has a handy lookup tool, so you can also search for the school name, but since some schools share names, make sure you’ve selected the right institution!

    Check out the ACT’s fee chart for the most up-to-date rate, for archived reports, and for priority rush reports!

And there you have it! Sending old ACT scores, even if you took the exam a while ago, isn’t so bad after all!


About Emily Faison

An avid reader and art enthusiast, Emily has degrees in English from Florida State University and Southeastern University. When she's not editing web content for a local magazine, you’ll probably find her catching up on her Netflix queue or reading a novel with a fresh cup of coffee at a local cafe.

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