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How the SAT Can Help You Prep for the (New) GRE

Ten years ago, you closed that SAT book for good, using it as nothing more than a dust collector in the corner of your room. Well, it may just be time to dust the cover off and take a trip down memory lane. That’s right—a great resource for GRE prep is the College Board book by SAT (oh, did I happen to mention that ETS owns the College Board?).

You may ask, why not just use many of the GRE books currently on the market? The answer is, the two are not mutually exclusive, so use both. While it’s true the sentence completions on the SAT are easier than those you’ll see on the GRE, by encountering words you’ve studied in the context of flashcards or lists, and applying them to actual questions, you’re more likely to store these words in long-term memory. Unfortunately, there are no analogies or antonyms. In a sense, the SAT has more in common with the revised GRE.

As for math, you’ll get to practice techniques such as plugging in and ball-parking, concepts such as 45:45:90 ratios and a problem spread very similar to the GRE (rates, geometry, word problems, etc.). The biggest difference is the SAT does not contain any Quantitative Comparison questions. However, the SAT does have fill-in-the-blank questions, which are a perfect way to get ready for the Numeric Entry on the revised GRE.

For both math and verbal, you’ll be getting questions that ETS has written. This is, in many ways, better than most of the big name publishers’ attempts to capture the complexity and nuances of the actual GRE.

So, take advantage of the SAT College Board book. And don’t despair, thinking you’ve been reduced to studying for the SATs. The main thing is your GRE score improves. And hey, maybe you will take one of the practice tests in the College Board book and blow away your high school SAT score. That’s something to feel good about.

By the way, students who use Magoosh GRE improve their scores by an average of 8 points on the new scale (150 points on the old scale.) Click here to learn more.

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