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GRE Vocabulary List- Money Matters- Part 1

Quite a few vocabulary words on the GRE deal with money– spending it, earning it, having it or not having it. Here is a list of some of the more popular (and tricky) ones.

How You Can Spend


If you are thrifty you spend money wisely.


The opposite of thrifty. If you are spendthrift you buy as though consumerism is going out of style.

Frugal vs. Miserly

Frugal is a synonym with thrifty. This word is often confused with miserly but they are not quite the same, If you are miserly you are overly careful about how much you spend. This word has a negative connotation and conjures up the image of a multimillionaire wearing threadbare clothes and heading to the soup kitchen for a meal.


A synonym with miserly and stingy.


This is a person who indulges in luxury. And though the word doesn’t directly relate to wealth, most of the times a sybarite has to be wealthy (though even the relatively penurious* amongst us can live the life of a sybarite, if he or she isn’t loath to run up several credit cards.)

How Much You Can Spend


The word pecuniary means of or relating to money. Impecunious means not having any money. (Pecunious, now obsolete, means—as you can probably guess—wealthy.)


This is a synonym for impecunious. Penurious also can be a synonym for miserly, so this word can be a little tricky.


If you are insolvent you can’t pay your bills. If you are solvent you do not owe any debts.


To be affluent is to be wealthy.


Okay, let’s try an antonym.


(A) affluent

(B) parsimonious

(C) reckless

(D) penurious

(E) solvent

Answer: If you are spendthrift you do not spend wisely. The opposite would be to spend wisely, conserve, or to spend very little or be miserly. Therefore the answer is (B) parsimonious.

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